Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for barn. Showing results for born.
holography (n.)

early 19c., of writing, from holograph + -y (4); physics sense, "process of using holograms," is from 1964, coined by discoverer, Hungarian-born physicist Gábor Dénes, from hologram on analogy of telegraphy/telegram.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pleb (n.)

"one of the common people, a low-born person," 1856 as a colloquial shortening of plebeian in the ancient Roman sense. West Point sense attested by 1851 (see plebe). Related: Plebbish.

Related entries & more 
Susan 
fem. proper name, from French Susanne, from Late Latin Susanna (see Susanna). A top-10 name for girls born in the U.S. 1945-1968 (peaking at #2 from 1957-60).
Related entries & more 
allogenic (adj.)
1888 in geology, from Greek allogenes "of another race, stranger," from allos "other, another, different" (see allo-) + -genes "born" (see -gen) + -ic. An earlier adjective was allogeneous "of a different kind or nature" (1842).
Related entries & more 
ecosphere (n.)
region around a star where conditions allow life-bearing planets to exist, 1953; see eco- + sphere. Apparently coined by German-born U.S. physician and space medicine pioneer Hubertus Strughold (1898-1986).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
puisne (adj.)

"junior, younger; inferior in rank," c. 1300 in Anglo-Latin, from Old French puisné "born later, younger, youngest" (see puny). As a noun from 1590s, "a junior, an inferior," especially "a judge of inferior rank."

Related entries & more 
Kafkaesque (adj.)
1947, resembling such situations as are explored in the fiction of Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German-speaking Jewish novelist born in Prague, Austria-Hungary. The surname is Czech German, literally "jackdaw," and is imitative.
Related entries & more 
BASIC 

computer language, 1964, initialism (acronym) for Beginners' All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code; invented by Hungarian-born U.S. computer scientist John G. Kemeny and U.S. computer scientist Thomas E. Kurtz.

Related entries & more 
countryman (n.)

c. 1300 (late 13c. as a surname), "one who lives in the open country, a peasant," from country + man (n.). From mid-14c. as "one born in the same country as another." Related: Countrywoman.

Related entries & more 
tachycardia (n.)
"rapid heartbeat," 1868, Modern Latin, coined 1867 by German-born physician Hermann Lebert (1813-1878) from tachy- "swift" + Latinized form of Greek kardia "heart," from PIE root *kerd- "heart."
Related entries & more 

Page 11