Etymology
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second-hand (adj.)
also secondhand, late 15c., from second (adj.) + hand (n.).
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second-rate (adj.)
1660s, originally of ships; see rate (n.).
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seconds (n.)
"articles below the first quality," c. 1600, plural of second (n.) "that which is after the first" (early 14c.), from second (adj.); originally attested in this sense in a Shakespeare sonnet. Meaning "second helping of food at a meal" is recorded from 1792.
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secrecy (n.)
1570s, from secretee, "quality of being secret" (early 15c.), from Old French secré, variant of secret (see secret (n.)) + -ty (2). Form altered on model of primacy, etc.
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secret (n.)
late 14c., from Latin secretus "set apart, withdrawn; hidden, concealed, private," past participle of secernere "to set apart, part, divide; exclude," from se- "without, apart," properly "on one's own" (see se-) + cernere "separate" (from PIE root *krei- "to sieve," thus "discriminate, distinguish").

As an adjective from late 14c., from French secret, adjective use of noun. Open secret is from 1828. Secret agent first recorded 1715; secret service is from 1737; secret weapon is from 1936.
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secret (v.)
"to keep secret" (described in OED as "obsolete"), 1590s, from secret (n.). Related: Secreted; secreting.
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secretaire (n.)
cabinet for private papers, 1771, from French secrétaire (13c.), from Medieval Latin secretarius (see secretary). Englished form secretary is attested in this sense from 1803.
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secretarial (adj.)
1801, from stem of secretary (Medieval Latin secretarius) + -al (1).
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