Etymology
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hobbyist (n.)
"one devoted to some pursuit for the delight of it," 1830, from hobby + -ist. Hobbyism is recorded from 1846.
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incinerator (n.)
"device for waste disposal by burning," 1872, from incinerate + Latinate agent noun suffix -or.
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Queens 
New York City borough, named for Catherine of Braganza, queen of English King Charles II.
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disfavour 
chiefly British English spelling of disfavor (q.v.); for ending, see -or. Related: Disfavoured; disfavouring.
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fertilizer (n.)
1660s, "something that fertilizes (land)," agent noun from fertilize. As a euphemism for "manure," from 1846.
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forearm (v.)
"prepare for an attack," 1590s, from fore- + arm (v.) "take up weapons." Related: Forearmed; forearming.
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Limoges (n.)
painted porcelain or enamel from Limoges in France, 1838; for place name see Limousine.
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nobelium (n.)

transuranic element, 1957, named for Alfred Nobel (q.v.). With metallic element ending -ium.

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practicability (n.)

"feasibility, capacity for being practiced," 1720, from practicable + -ity. The earlier word was practicableness (1640s). 

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state-house (n.)
1630s, American English, "a building used for public business," from state (n.2) + house (n.).
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