Etymology
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leu (n.)
monetary unit of Romania, introduced 1867, literally "lion." Monetary names in the Balkans often translate as "lion" because Dutch gold coins stamped with lions circulated widely in the region in the 17c. and the word for "lion" came to be a word for "money" in some languages there.
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draughts (n.)

British name for the tabletop game that in U.S. is checkers, c. 1400, from draught, probably because the pieces are "dragged" over the board in making moves. Draught (n.) also was used for "a move in chess." Earlier the game is recorded as jeu de dames (late 14c.).

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REM (n.1)

also R.E.M., rem, unit for measuring ionizing radiation, 1947, acronym of roentgen equivalent man.

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choo-choo (n.)
Child's name for "steam-engine locomotive," 1895, echoic (choo-choo cars is attested from 1891).
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Bolivia 
South American republic, founded 1825, named for Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), statesman and soldier.
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SNCF 
French national railway, 1949, initialism (acronym) for Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer.
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patronise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of patronize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize. Related: Patronised; patronising.
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belabour (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of belabor (q.v.); for spelling, see -or. Related: Belaboured; belabouring.
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mesmerise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of mesmerize (v.); for suffix, see -ize. Related: Mesmerised; mesmerising.
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epitomise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of epitomize. For spelling, see -ize. Related: Epitomised; epitomises; epitomising.
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