Etymology
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sea-anemone (n.)

by 1742; see sea + anemone. Another name for it was sea-pudding (1750).

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hob (n.)
"clown, prankster," short for hobgoblin (q.v.). Hence, to play (the) hob "make mischief" (by 1834).
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Bougainvillea (n.)

type of tropical woody vine, 1849, named for French navigator Louis Bougainville (1729-1811).

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stent (n.)
"tube implanted temporarily," 1964, named for Charles T. Stent (1807-1885), English dentist.
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ziti (n.)
type of tubular pasta, plural of zita (1845), from Italian, said to be a dialect word for "bridegroom."
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meagre (adj.)

chiefly British English spelling of meager (q.v.); for spelling, see -re. Related: Meagrely; meagreness.

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bushwa (n.)
also bushwah, 1906, U.S. slang, perhaps originally among students, euphemistic for bullshit (n.).
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civil union (n.)
by 2000, the usual U.S. term for legally recognized same-sex unions short of marriage.
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flavour 
chiefly British English spelling of flavor; for spelling, see -or. Related: Flavoured; flavourful; flavouring.
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homogenise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of homogenize; for suffix, see -ize. Related: Homogenised; homogenising; homogenisation.
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