Etymology
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transcribe (v.)
1550s, from Latin transcribere "to copy, write again in another place, write over, transfer," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). To do it poorly is to transcribble (1746). Related: Transcribed; transcriber; transcribing.
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superscribe (v.)
"write on the surface" (especially of an envelope), 1590s, from Latin superscribere "write over or above" (see superscript). Related: Superscribed; superscribing.
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inscribe (v.)
1550s, "to write on or in" (something durable and conspicuous), from Latin inscribere "to write on or in (something)," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Meaning "to dedicate (by means of an inscription)" is from 1640s. Form inscriven is from late 14c. Related: Inscribed; inscribing.
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descriptive (adj.)

"serving or aiming to describe," 1751, from Late Latin descriptivus, from descript-, past-participle stem of describere "to write down, copy; sketch, represent," from de "down" (see de-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Related: Descriptively; descriptiveness.

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shrive (v.)
Old English scrifan "assign, prescribe, ordain, decree; impose penance, hear confession; have regard for, care for," apparently originally "to write" (strong, past tense scraf, past participle scrifen), from Proto-Germanic *skriban (source also of Old Saxon scriban, Old Frisian skriva "write; impose penance;" Old Dutch scrivan, Dutch schrijven, German schreiben "to write, draw, paint;" Danish skrifte "confess"), an early borrowing from Latin scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"), which in Old English and Scandinavian developed further to "confess, hear confession."
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prescribe (v.)

mid-15c., prescriben, "to write down as a direction, law, or rule," from Latin praescribere "write before, prefix in writing; ordain, determine in advance," from prae "before" (see pre-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Related: Prescribed; prescribing. Medical sense of "advise, appoint, or designate as a remedy for a disease" is from 1580s, probably a back formation from prescription.

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scribe (v.)

mid-15c., scriben, "to write," from Latin scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The carpentry sense "mark or score with (an outline)" is from 1670s, of uncertain origin, perhaps a shortening of describe. Related: Scribed; scriber; scribing.

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subscribe (v.)
early 15c., "to sign at the bottom of a document," from Latin subscribere "write, write underneath, sign one's name; register," also figuratively "assent, agree to, approve," from sub "underneath" (see sub-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The meaning "give one's consent" (by subscribing one's name) first recorded mid-15c.; that of "contribute money to" 1630s; and that of "become a regular buyer of a publication" 1711, all originally literal. Related: Subscribed; subscribing.
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graphomania (n.)
"morbid desire for writing," 1811, from Greek graphein "to write" (see -graphy) + mania. Related: Graphomaniac.
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ascription (n.)

1590s, "action of adding in writing;" c. 1600, "attribution of authorship or origin," from Latin ascriptionem (nominative ascriptio) "an addition in writing," noun of action from past-participle stem of ascribere "to write in, add to in a writing; impute, attribute," from ad "to" (see ad-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

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