Etymology
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hash (n.1)

"a stew of meat cut into small pieces," 1660s, from hash (v.). Meaning "a mix, a mess" is from 1735. Cryptographic use in computing is by 1979.

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lean (n.2)
c. 1200, "lean animals or persons," from lean (adj.). Meaning "lean part of anything, muscle without fat, lean meat" is mid-15c.
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sandwich (v.)

"insert between two other things," 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of meat pressed between identical pieces of bread. Related: Sandwiched; sandwiching.

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Argentina 
South American nation, from Latin argentinus "of silver," from PIE root *arg- "to shine; white," hence "silver" as the shining or white metal. It is a Latinized form of (Rio) de la Plata "Silver River," from Spanish plata "silver" (see plate (n.)).
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brawn (n.)
late 13c., "boar's flesh;" early 14c., "flesh of a muscular part of the body," from Old French braon "fleshy or muscular part, buttock," from Frankish *brado "ham, roast" or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *bred-on- (source also of Old High German brato "tender meat," German Braten "roast," Old Norse brað "raw meat," Old English bræd "flesh"), from PIE *bhre- "burn, heat," from root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn."

The etymological sense is "piece of meat suitable for roasting." "The specific sense 'boar's flesh' is exclusively of English development, and characteristic of English habits" [OED]. Meaning "well-developed muscles, muscular strength" is from 1865.
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well-done (adj.)
c. 1200, "wise, prudent," from well (adv.) + done. Meaning "thoroughly cooked," in reference to meat, is attested from 1747. Well done! as an exclamation of approval is recorded from mid-15c.
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tamale (n.)
1856, false singular from tamales (1690s), from American Spanish tamales, plural of tamal, from Nahuatl tamal, tamalli, a food made of Indian corn and meat.
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aegyo sal (n.)

the puff of skin under the eyes, by 2015, from Korean, literally "cute(ness) flesh" from aegyo “cuteness” + sal “skin, meat, fat, flesh.”

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Caucasian (n.)

"resident or native of the Caucasus," 1843; see Caucasian (adj.). Meaning "one of the 'white' race" is from 1830.

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bully pulpit (n.)
1904, coined by U.S. president Theodore Roosevelt, in reference to the White House.
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