Etymology
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weatherman (n.)

"one who observes the weather," 1869, from weather (n.) + man (n.). Weather-prophet is from 1784 as "barometer;" 1827 as "person who predicts the weather."

Clerk of the Weather, I deplore
That all thy greatness is no more,
As should a gentle bard;
That Nature, or that Nature's law
When you politely called for thaw,
Gave frost was rather hard.
[from "Consolatory Address to Mr. Murphy, the Weather Prophet," Colburn's New Monthly Magazine, 1838]
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weaver (n.)
mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from weave (v.). The weaver-bird (1826) so called from the ingenuity of its nests.
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Weber 
surname attested from 1255; literally "weaver" (see web).
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weet (v.)
"to know" (archaic), 1540s, from Middle English weten, variant of witen "to know" (see wit (v.)).
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West Bank 
in reference to the former Jordanian territory west of the River Jordan, 1967.
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westernization (n.)

also westernisation, 1873, noun of action from westernize (v.). Earliest reference is to Japan.

[The mikado's] late rapid and radical progress in westernization (to evolve a word that the Japanese will need) justifies great expectations of him. [Coates Kinney, "Japanning the English Language," The Galaxy, July-Dec. 1873]
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bed-wetting (n.)
"involuntary urination while sleeping," 1844, from bed (n.) + present participle of wet (v.). Related: Bed-wetter.
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paper-weight (n.)

"small, heavy object used to hold down loose papers," by 1832, from paper (n.) + weight (n.).

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weed (v.)
"to clear the ground of weeds," late Old English weodian "to weed," from the source of weed (n.). Figurative use by c. 1400. Related: Weeded; weeding; weeder.
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weave (v.2)
c. 1200, "to move from one place to another," of uncertain origin, perhaps from weave (v.1). From early 14c. as "move to and fro;" 1590s as "move side to side." Use in boxing is from 1818. Related: Weaved; weaving.
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