Etymology
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taroc (n.)
1610s, name of an old card game of Italy, Austria, etc., played originally with a 78-card deck that includes four suits, four face-cards each, plus the tarot cards as trumps; from Old Italian tarocchi (plural); see tarot.
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riser (n.)

late 14c., risere, "rebel, insurgent, one who rises in revolt," agent noun from rise (v.). Meaning "one who rises" (from bed, in a certain manner) is from mid-15c. Meaning "upright face of a stair-step" is by 1738.

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pros- 

word-forming element in words of Greek origin meaning "to, toward, before," from Greek pros (prep., adv.), also proti, "from, forth, from (one point) toward (another); furthermore; in the face of," from PIE *proti- (source also of Sanskrit prati "to, against").

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brock (n.)
Old English brocc "badger," a borrowing from Celtic (compare Old Irish brocc, Welsh broch), "probably so called for its white-streaked face. After c. 1400, often with the adjective stinking and meaning "a low, dirty fellow."
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cork (v.)

1570s, "to put a cork sole on a shoe," from cork (n.)). Meaning "to stop with a cork" is from 1640s. Figurative sense "to stop or check" is from 1640s. Meaning "blacken with burnt cork," especially the face, to perform in theatrical blackface, is from 1836. Related: Corked; corking.

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whisker (n.)
"hair of a man's face" (usually plural), c. 1600, originally a playful formation, from Middle English wisker "anything that whisks or sweeps" (early 15c.), agent noun from whisk (v.). In reference to animal lip hair, recorded from 1670s. Related: Whiskered; whiskers.
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corbel (n.)

"piece of stone, wood, etc., projecting from the vertical face of a wall to support some object," mid-14c., from Old French corbel, diminutive of corb "raven," from Latin corvus (see corvine); so called from its beaked shape. Corbel-step is attested from 1819.

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rubicund (adj.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "reddish, flushed," especially of the face, especially as a result of indulgence in appetites, from Old French rubicond (14c.) and directly from Latin rubicundus, from rubere "to be red," from ruber "red" (from PIE root *reudh- "red, ruddy"). Related: Rubicundity.

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muffler (n.)

1530s, "a kind of wrap or scarf for the throat and lower part of the face," agent noun from muffle (v.). Mechanical sense of "any device used to deaden sound" is by 1856; specifically as "automobile exhaust system silencer" it is attested from 1895.

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comedo (n.)

"blackhead; hard, blackish tubercule on the skin of the face," 1852, from Latin comedo "glutton," from comedere "to eat up" (see comestible). A name formerly given to worms that devour the body; transferred in medical use to secretions that resemble them.

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