Etymology
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assumpsit (n.)
"legal action for recovery of damages through breach of contract," legal Latin, literally "he has taken upon himself," perfect indicative of assumere "to take up, take to oneself" (see assume). The word embodies the allegation that the defendant promised or undertook to perform the specified act.
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agreeance (n.)

1530s, from French agréance, noun of action from agréer "to please, satisfy; take pleasure in" (see agree).

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assumptive (adj.)

"capable of being assumed; characterized by assumptions," early 15c., from Medieval Latin assumptivus, from assumpt-, past-participle stem of assumere/adsumere "take up, take to oneself" (see assume) + -ive. The oldest sense in English is medical, of bloodletting, "withdrawing humors from opposite parts of the body."

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intercept (v.)
c. 1400, "to cut off" (a line), "prevent" (the spread of a disease), from Latin interceptus, past participle of intercipere "take or seize between, to seize in passing," from inter "between" (see inter-) + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take, catch," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Intercepted; intercepting.
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remove (v.)

early 14c., remouven, remuvien, remēven, "take (something) away; dismiss" from an office, post or situation; from Old French removoir "move, stir; leave, depart; take away," from Latin removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

Sense of "go away, leave, depart, move" from a position occupied is from late 14c.; the intransitive sense of "change (one's) place, move from one place to another" also is from 14c. Related: Removed; removing.

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animadvert (v.)

early 15c., animadverten, "to take notice of," from Latin animadvertere "to notice, take cognizance of," also "to censure, blame, punish," literally "turn the mind to," from animus "the mind" (see animus) + advertere "turn to" (see advertise). The sense of "to criticize, blame, censure" in English is attested from 1660s. Related: Animadverted; animadverting.

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waspish (adj.)
"irascible, quick to take offense; spiteful," 1560s, from wasp + -ish. Related: Waspishly; waspishness.
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warn (v.)

Old English warnian "to give notice of impending danger," also intransitive, "to take heed," from Proto-Germanic *warōnan (source also of Old Norse varna "to admonish," Old High German warnon "to take heed," German warnen "to warn"), from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover." Related: Warned; warning.

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possible (n.)

"that which may take place or come into being," 1640s, from possible (adj.).

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deconstruct (v.)

"undo the construction of, take to pieces," 1973, a back-formation from deconstruction (q.v.). Related: Deconstructed; deconstructing.

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