Etymology
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collectivism (n.)

1880, in socialist theory, "the principle of centralization of social and economic power in the people collectively" (opposed to individualism), from collective + -ism. Related: Collectivist (1882 as both noun and adjective); collectivization (1890).

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mesalliance (n.)

also misalliance, "marriage with a person of lower social position," 1782, from French mésalliance, from pejorative prefix mes- (from Latin mis-; see mis-) + alliance (see alliance). In English form misalliance from 1738.

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facebook (n.)

directory listing names and headshots, by 1983, originally among U.S. college students, from face (n.) + book (n.). The social networking Web site of that name (with capital F-) dates from 2004.

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proactive (adj.)

also pro-active, of persons or policies, as an opposition to reactive, "taking the initiative in a situation, anticipating events" as opposed to responding to them, 1921, from pro- + active. From 1933, in psychology (learning theory). Related: Proactively; proactiveness; proactivity.

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Koblenz 

also Coblenz, city in Germany, founded by the Romans as a military outpost c. 8 B.C.E., from Latin ad confluentes "at the confluence" (see confluence); so named for its situation at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle rivers.

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deja vu 

"feeling of having previously experienced a present situation," 1903, from French déjà vu, literally "already seen." The phenomenon also is known as promnesia. Similar phenomena are déjà entendu "already heard" (of music, etc.), 1965; and déjà lu "already read" (1960).

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polarization (n.)

1812, "state of having different properties on different sides," from polarize + -ation, and in part from French polarisation, noun of action from polariser. Figuratively from 1871; of social and political groups, "accentuation of differences," from 1945.

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chivalry (n.)

c. 1300, "body or host of knights; knighthood in the feudal social system; bravery in war, warfare as an art," from Old French chevalerie "knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry, art of war," from chevaler "knight," from Medieval Latin caballarius "horseman," from Latin caballus "nag, pack-horse" (see cavalier).

From late 14c. as "the nobility as one of the estates of the realm," also as the word for an ethical code emphasizing honor, valor, generosity and courtly manners. Modern use for "social and moral code of medieval feudalism" probably is an 18c. historical revival.

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misery (n.)

late 14c., "state of grievous affliction, condition of external unhappiness," from Old French misere "miserable situation, misfortune, distress" (12c.), from Latin miseria "wretchedness," from miser "wretched, pitiable" (see miser). Meaning "condition of one in great sorrow or mental distress" is from 1530s.

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