Etymology
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No results were found for positive correlation. Showing results for position.
platoon (v.)
in baseball, "to alternate (a player) with another in the same position," 1967, from platoon (n.), which had been used in team sports since 1941.
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leadership (n.)
1821, "position of a leader, command," from leader + -ship. Sense extended by late 19c. to "characteristics necessary to be a leader, capacity to lead."
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unsettle (v.)
1590s, "undo from a fixed position," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + settle (v.). Of the mind, feelings, etc., attested from 1640s. Related: Unsettled; unsettling.
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heel (n.2)
"contemptible person," 1914 in U.S. underworld slang, originally "incompetent or worthless criminal," perhaps from a sense of "person in the lowest position" and thus from heel (n.1).
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cornered (adj.)

late 14c., "having corners," past-participle adjective from corner (v.). Figurative sense "forced or driven into a position where surrender or defeat is inevitable" is from 1824.

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paste-up (n.)

1930, in printing, "a plan of a page with the position of text, illustrations, etc. indicated," from verbal phrase; see paste (v.) + up (adv.).

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stewardship (n.)
"position or responsibilities of a steward," mid-15c., from steward (n.) + -ship. Specific ecclesiastical sense of "responsible use of resources in the service of God" is from 1899.
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eye-tooth (n.)
also eyetooth, "upper canine tooth," 1570s, so called for its position immediately under or next to the eye. Compare German Augenzahn. Related: Eye-teeth.
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subsist (v.)

1540s, "to exist;" c. 1600, "retain the existing state," from French subsister and directly from Latin subsistere "to stand still or firm, take a stand, take position; abide, hold out," from sub "under, up to" (see sub-) + sistere "to assume a standing position, stand still, remain; set, place, cause to stand still" (from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Meaning "to support oneself" (in a certain way) is from 1640s. Related: Subsisted; subsisting.

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true (v.)
"make true in position, form, or adjustment," 1841, from true (adj.) in the sense "agreeing with a certain standard." Related: Trued; truing.
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