Etymology
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neckerchief (n.)

"scarf for the neck," late 14c., from neck (n.) + kerchief, which is, etymologically "a covering for the head," making the whole formation pleonastic. Corrupted form neckercher is from mid-15c.

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aerodrome (n.)

1902, "hangar for airships," from aero- on analogy of hippodrome. From 1909 as "airport." Earlier (1891) a name for a flying machine, from Greek aerodromos "a running through the air."

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bedpan (n.)

also bed-pan, 1580s, "pan for warming beds," from bed (n.) + pan (n.). From 1670s as a utensil for bodily functions of persons confined in bed.

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desire (v.)
Origin and meaning of desire

"to wish or long for, express a wish to obtain," c. 1200, desiren, from Old French desirrer (12c.) "wish, desire, long for," from Latin desiderare "long for, wish for; demand, expect," the original sense perhaps being "await what the stars will bring," from the phrase de sidere "from the stars," from sidus (genitive sideris) "heavenly body, star, constellation" (but see consider). Related: Desired; desiring.

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poor-box (n.)

"box for receiving contributions of money for the poor," generally at the entrance of a church, 1620s, from poor (n.) + box (n.1).

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camelopard (n.)

an old name for "giraffe," late 14c., from Late Latin camelopardus, shortened from Latin camelopardalis, from Greek kamelopardalis "a giraffe," a compound of kamelos "camel" (see camel), for the long neck, and pardos "leopard, panther" (see pard (n.1)), for the spots.

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Bartlett 

U.S. name for a variety of pear, 1835, named for Enoch Bartlett, who first distributed them in the U.S. The quotation collection is named for U.S. bookstore owner John Bartlett of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who first printed his "A Collection of Familiar Quotations" in 1855.

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Hitler 

used figuratively for "a dictator" from 1934.

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yokel (n.)

1812, perhaps from dialectal German Jokel, disparaging name for a farmer, originally diminutive of Jakob. Or perhaps from English yokel, dialectal name for "woodpecker."

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Saul 

masc. proper name, Biblical first king of Israel, from Latin Saul, from Hebrew Shaul, literally "asked for," passive participle of sha'al "he asked for."

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