Etymology
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consumptive (adj.)

early 15c., "wasteful, destructive," also with reference to pulmonary consumption, from Latin consumpt-, stem of consumere (see consume) + -ive. As a noun, attested from late 14c., "medicine that reduces or eliminates" (morbid humors or tissues); from 1660s as "one who suffers from consumption."

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rhinology (n.)

"sum of scientific knowledge concerning the nose" [Century Dictionary]; by 1838, but as "science of divining characters by the dimensions of the nose," from rhino- "nose" + -logy "study of." As a branch of medicine concerned with nasal and sinus problems, by 1874. Related: Rhinological; rhinologist.

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cardamom (n.)
"seed-capsule of a plant native to southern India and Ceylon," used in medicine and cookery, 1550s, from French cardamome, from Latin cardamomum, from Greek kardamomon, from kardamon "cress" (which is of unknown origin) + amomon "spice plant." The word was in English from late 14c. in Latin form.
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opiate (n.)

"medicine containing opium," early 15c., from Medieval Latin opiatus, from Latin opium (see opium). Figurative sense of "anything that dulls the feelings and induces rest or inaction" is from 1640s. From 1540s in English as an adjective, "made with or containing opium," hence "inducing sleep, narcotic."

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repercussive (adj.)

late 14c., repercussif, "having the power to drive back" (originally in medicine, in reference to excessive concentrations of a humor), from Old French repercussif and directly from Medieval Latin repercussivus, from Latin repercuss-, past-participle stem of repercutere "to strike or beat back" (see repercussion). Related: Repercussively; repercussiveness.

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forensic (adj.)
"pertaining to or suitable for courts of law," 1650s, with -ic + stem of Latin forensis "of a forum, place of assembly," related to forum "public place" (see forum). Later used especially in sense of "pertaining to legal trials," as in forensic medicine (1845). Related: Forensical (1580s).
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introjection (n.)
1856, in medicine, from intro- "on the inside, within" + stem abstracted from projection, interjection. In philosophical (1892) and psychoanalytical (1911) uses, from German introjektion; in the former sense the coinage is credited to Swiss-German philosopher Richard Avenarius (1843-1896), in the latter Sándor Ferenczi (1873-1933).
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relaxant (adj.)

1771, "causing or distinguished by relaxation," from Latin relaxantem (nominative relaxans), present participle of relaxare "to loosen, stretch out" (see relax). As a noun, "a medicine or treatment that relaxes or opens," from 1832. An earlier adjective was relaxative "having the quality of relaxing" (1610s).

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apertive (n.)

"medicine capable of opening or dilating" (pores, bowels, etc.), "a laxative," early 15c., also as an adjective, from Latin aperitivus, from aperire "to open, uncover," from PIE compound *ap-wer-yo- from *ap- "off, away" (see apo-) + root *wer- (4) "to cover." Also aperient (1620s).

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micromania (n.)

1879, "A form of mania in which the patient thinks himself, or some part of himself, to be reduced in size" ["Sydenham Society's Lexicon of Medicine and the Allied Sciences"], from Greek mikros "small" (see micro-) + mania. Also used in reference to insane self-belittling (by 1899).

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