Etymology
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lambada (n.)
type of sensual Brazilian dance, 1988, from Portuguese, said in some sources to mean literally "a beating, a lashing." But others [Watkins] connect it ultimately to Latin lumbus "loin" (see lumbo-).
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brief (n.)

early 14c., bref, "a writing issued by authority," from Latin breve (genitive brevis), noun derivative of adjective brevis "short, little" (from PIE root *mregh-u- "short") which came to mean "letter, summary," specifically a letter of the pope (less ample and solemn than a bull), and thus came to mean "letter of authority," which yielded the modern, legal sense of "systematic summary of the facts of a case" (1630s). Sense of "a short or concise writing" is from 1560s. In German, Brief has become the general word for "an epistle or letter."

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Amelia 

fem. proper name, Latin, but said to be of Germanic origin and mean literally "laborious" (cognates: Old Norse ama "to trouble"); the name was assimilated with Roman gens name Aemilia.

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yin (n.)
feminine or negative principle in Chinese philosophy, 1670s, from Chinese (Mandarin) yin, said to mean "female, night, lunar," or "shade, feminine, the moon." Compare yang. Yin-yang is from 1850.
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inconclusive (adj.)
1660s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + conclusive. Related: Inconclusively. Inconclusion is "rare," perhaps because it could mean either "reaching no conclusion" or "reaching an unwarranted conclusion." Related: Inconclusiveness.
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chintzy (adj.)

1851, from chintz + -y (2). "decorated or covered with chintz," especially in a derogatory extended sense "suburban, unfashionable, petit-bourgeois, cheap; mean, stingy" [OED].

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Shannon 

river in Ireland, the name is said to mean something like "old man river," from a Proto-Celtic word related to Irish sean "old" (from PIE root *sen- "old").

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successful (adj.)
1580s, from success + -ful. Originally "having or resulting in any kind of success;" since late 19c. it has tended to mean "wealthy, resulting in financial prosperity" unless otherwise indicated. Related: Successfully.
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strepto- 
word-forming element used in science to mean "twisted," from Latinized combining form of Greek streptos "twisted, easy to bend, pliant," verbal adjective of strephein "to turn, twist," from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn."
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Etruscan (n.)

1706, from Latin Etruscus "an Etruscan," from Etruria, ancient name of Tuscany (see Tuscan); of uncertain origin but containing an element that might mean "water" (see Basque) and which could be a reference to the rivers in the region.

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