Etymology
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daylong (adj.)

also day-long, "lasting all day," Old English dæglang; see day + long (adj.).

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ever (adv.)

Old English æfre "ever, at any time, always;" of uncertain origin, no cognates in any other Germanic language; perhaps a contraction of a in feore, literally "ever in life" (the expression a to fore is common in Old English writings). First element is almost certainly related to Old English a "always, ever," from Proto-Germanic *aiwi-, extended form of PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity." Liberman suggests second element is comparative adjectival suffix -re.

Sometimes contracted to e'er in dialect and poetry. Ever began to be used in late Old English as a way to generalize or intensify when, what, where, etc. The sense evolution was from "at any time at all, in any way" to "at any particular time; at some time or another; under any circumstances." Ever so "to whatever extent" is recorded by 1680s. Expression did you ever? (implying "see/do/hear of such a thing") attested by 1840.

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oblong (adj.)

"elongated, having one principal axis considerably longer than the others," early 15c., from Latin oblongus "more long than broad," originally "somewhat long," from ob "in front of; towards" here perhaps intensive (see ob-) + longus "long" (see long (adj.)). As a noun, "an oblong figure," from c. 1600.

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macrocephalic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a large head (of a person)," 1851, from Greek makrokephalos, from makros "large, long" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin") + kephalē "head" (see cephalo-). Related: Macrocephalous"having a long head" (1810); macrocephaly.

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macrobiotic (adj.)

also macro-biotic, 1797, "tending to prolong life," 1797, from Greek makrobiotikos "long-lived," from makros "long" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin") + bios "life" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). The specific reference to a Zen Buddhist dietary system dates from 1936. Hence macrobiote "a long-lived person or animal" (1852); macrobiosis "long life, longevity" (1837); macrobiotics "the study of longevity" (by 1832); "theory of macrobiotic diets" (by 1948).

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macron (n.)

"short horizontal line placed over a vowel to indicate length," 1827, from Latinized form of Greek makron, neuter of makros "long" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin").

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longshanks (n.)
"long-legged person," 1550s, originally in reference to Edward I of England (1239-1307); from long (adj.) + shank (n.).
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timewise (adv.)
also time-wise, 1898, from time (n.) + wise (n.).
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peacetime (n.)

also peace-time, "time when a country is not at war," 1550s, from peace + time (n.).

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institution (n.)
c. 1400, "action of establishing or founding (a system of government, a religious order, etc.)," from Old French institucion "foundation; thing established" (12c.), from Latin institutionem (nominative institutio) "a disposition, arrangement; instruction, education," noun of state from institutus (see institute (v.)).

Meaning "established law or practice" is from 1550s. Meaning "establishment or organization for the promotion of some charity" is from 1707. Jocular or colloquial use for "anything that's been around a long time" is from 1837.
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