Etymology
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symbiosis (n.)
1876, as a biological term, "union for life of two different organisms based on mutually benefit," from Greek symbiosis "a living together," from symbioun "live together," from symbios "(one) living together (with another), partner, companion, husband or wife," from assimilated form of syn- "together" (see syn-) + bios "life" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Given a wider (non-biological) sense by 1921. An earlier sense of "communal or social life" is found in 1620s. A back-formed verb symbiose is recorded from 1960.
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ephemeron (n.)

"insect which lives for a very short time in its winged state," 1620s, from Greek (zōon) ephemeron, neuter of adjective ephemeros "living but a day" (see ephemera). Figurative use by 1771.

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corse (n.)

late 13c., "a dead body;" c. 1300, "a living body;" c. 1400, "the main part of anything," from Old French cors, from Latin corpus "body" (from PIE root *kwrep- "body, form, appearance"). Archaic from 16c.; compare corpse.

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vegetable (adj.)
early 15c., "capable of life or growth; growing, vigorous;" also "neither animal nor mineral, of the plant kingdom, living and growing as a plant," from Old French vegetable "living, fit to live," and directly from Medieval Latin vegetabilis "growing, flourishing," from Late Latin vegetabilis "animating, enlivening," from Latin vegetare "to enliven," from vegetus "vigorous, enlivened, active, sprightly," from vegere "to be alive, active, to quicken," from PIE root *weg- "to be strong, be lively." The meaning "resembling that of a vegetable, dull, uneventful; having life such as a plant has" is attested from 1854 (see vegetable (n.)).
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organically (adv.)

1680s in reference to bodily organs, "in an organic manner;" 1862 in reference to living beings; 1841 as "as part of an organized whole;" from organic. From 1971 as "without the use of pesticides, etc."

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acclimatization (n.)
"modification of a living thing to allow it to endure in a foreign climate," 1830, noun of action from acclimate. There is or was a tendency to use this word in reference to animals and plants and acclimation of humans.
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biosphere (n.)

"Earth's surface and lower atmosphere as the realm of living organisms," 1899, from or modeled on German Biosphäre (1875), which was coined by German geologist Eduard Suess; see bio- + sphere.

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aquatic (adj.)
late 15c., "pertaining to water," from Old French aquatique (13c.), from Latin aquaticus "growing in water; bringing rain," from aqua "water" (from PIE root *akwa- "water"). From 1640s as "living in water."
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latebrous (adj.)
"full of hiding places," 1650s, from Latin latebrosus, from latebra "a hiding place," from latere "to lie hidden" (see latent). Hence latebricole "living or lurking in holes" (of spiders, etc.), from Latin latebricola "one who dwells in lurking places."
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animalcule (n.)
"very small animal," especially a microscopic one, 1590s, from Late Latin animalculum (plural animalcula), diminutive of Latin animal "living being" (see animal (n.)). In early use also of mice, insects, etc. Related: Animalcular; animalculine.
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