Etymology
Advertisement
demiss (adj.)

"submissive, humble, lowly," 1570s, from Latin demissus "let down, lowered," past participle of demittere, literally "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to let go, send, release" (see mission).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
boomlet (n.)

"small burst of activity, prosperity, etc.," 1880, from boom (n.3) + -let.

Related entries & more 
ludicrous (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to play or sport" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin ludicrus "sportive" (source of Old French ludicre), from ludicrum "amusement, game, toy, source of amusement, joke," from ludere "to play."

This verb, along with Latin ludus "a game, play," is from the PIE root *leid- or *loid- "to play," perhaps literally "to let go frequently" [de Vaan], which is the source also of Middle Irish laidid "impels;" Greek lindesthai "to contend," lizei "plays;" Albanian lind "gives birth," lindet "is born;" Old Lithuanian leidmi "I let," Lithuanian leisti "to let," laidyti "to throw," Latvian laist "let, publish, set in motion."

Sense of "ridiculous, apt to evoke ridicule or jest" is attested from 1782. Related: Ludicrously; ludicrousness.

Related entries & more 
maisonette (n.)

1818, "small house," from French maisonnette, diminutive of maison "house" (11c.), from Latin mansionem (see mansion). Meaning "a part of a building let separately" is by 1889.

You see, this is how it stands: I live in what the fellow who let the thing to me called a "maisonette"—goodness only knows why .... [Windsor Magazine, 1902]
Related entries & more 
booklet (n.)

"a small book," 1859, from book (n.) + diminutive ending -let.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
droplet (n.)

"a little drop," c. 1600, from drop (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

Related entries & more 
condescendence (n.)

1630s, "act of condescending," from French condescendance, from condescendre"to consent, give in, yield," from Latin condescendere  "to let oneself down" (see condescend). Related: Condescendency.

Related entries & more 
demit (v.)

early 15c., demitten, "to run or flow down," also figurative, "to humble oneself," from Old French demetre "to send, put, or let down," and directly from Latin demittere "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

Related entries & more 
pretermit (v.)

1510s, "neglect to do, leave undone," from Latin praetermittere "let pass, overlook," from praeter- (see preter-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). From 1530s as "intentionally omit, leave unnoticed or unmentioned." Related: Pretermitted; pretermitting.

Related entries & more 
caveat emptor 

1520s, Latin, literally "let the buyer beware;" see caveat and second element of exempt (adj.).

Related entries & more 

Page 10