Etymology
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boot (v.1)
"to kick, drive by kicking," 1877, American English, from boot (n.1). Earlier "to beat with a boot" (a military punishment), 1802. Generalized sense of "eject, kick (out)" is from 1880. To give (someone) the boot "dismiss, kick out" is from 1888. Related: Booted; booting.
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kickstand (n.)
also kick-stand, "metal support for holding a bicycle upright," 1936, from kick (n.) + stand (n.). So called for the method of putting it in position.
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kicker (n.)
1570s, originally of horses, agent noun from kick (v.). Kickee is recorded from 1820.
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recalcitrate (v.)

1620s, "to kick out," from Latin recalcitratus, past participle of recalcitrare "to kick back" (see recalcitrant). Sense of "resist obstinately" is from 1759. Related: Recalcitrated; recalcitrating; recalcitration.

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punt (n.1)

in football, "a kick of the ball as it is dropped from the hands and before it strikes the ground," 1845; from punt (v.).

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tae kwon do 
1967, from Korean, said to represent tae "kick" + kwon "fist" + do "art, way, method."
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footer (n.)
c. 1600, "a pedestrian;" 1781, "a kick at football;" 1863, British student slang, "the game of football;" see foot (n.), football, -er.
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punt (v.1)

"to kick a ball dropped from the hands before it hits the ground," 1845, first in a Rugby list of football rules, of obscure origin; perhaps from dialectal punt "to push, strike," alteration of Midlands dialect bunt "to push, butt with the head," of unknown origin, perhaps echoic (compare bunt).

Student slang meaning "give up, drop a course so as not to fail," 1970s, is because a U.S. football team punts when it cannot advance the ball. Related: Punted; punting.

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kicky (adj.)
1790, "clever; showy, gaudy," from kick (n.) in the 18c. sense "that which is stylish" + -y (2). Meaning "full of thrills, providing kicks" is from 1968. Kickish "given to kicking" is from 1580s.
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runback (n.)

also run-back, by 1944 in U.S. football, "a run to advance the ball after catching a kick or punt," from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + back (adv.).

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