Etymology
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waggish (adj.)
"willing to make a fool of oneself, and fond of doing so to others," 1580s, from wag (n.) + -ish. Related: Waggishly; waggishness.
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freakish (adj.)
1650s, "capricious," from freak (n.) + -ish. Meaning "grotesque" is recorded from 1805. Related: Freakishly; freakishness. Keats has freakful.
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Scottish (adj.)

late Old English Scottisc, "of Scottish nationality; found or done in Scotland;" see Scot + -ish. Related: Scottishness.

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coltish (adj.)

late 14c., "wild, frisky," also in early use "lustful, lewd," from colt + -ish. Literal sense of "pertaining to a colt" is recorded from 1540s. Related: Coltishly.

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babyish (adj.)
"like a baby, extremely childish," 1753, from baby (n.) + -ish. Earlier in same sense was babish (1530s). Related: Babyishness.
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heathenish (adj.)
Old English hæðenisc; see heathen + -ish. Related: Heathenishly; heathenishness. Similar formation in Dutch heidensch, Old High German hiedanisc, German heidenisch.
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bullish (adj.)
1560s, "of the nature of a bull," from bull (n.1) + -ish; stock market sense "tending to advance in price" is from 1882. Related: Bullishly; bullishness.
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Finnish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Finland or its inhabitants," c. 1790, from Finn + -ish. Earlier was Finnic (1660s as a noun, in reference to the language). Related: Finno-.

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clannish (adj.)

1748, "pertaining to a clan; disposed to adhere closely to one another, imbued with prejudices, narrow or restricted in social interests and feeling," from clan + -ish. Related: Clannishly; clannishness.

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Moorish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Moors," mid-15c., moreis, morys, morreys, from Moor + -ish. Earlier was Moreske (mid-14c.), from Old French moresque, morisque. Also compare Morisco, Moresco.

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