Etymology
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mightily (adv.)

"in a mighty manner; by great power, force, or strength," Old English mihtiglice; see mighty + -ly (2).

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staycation (n.)

also stay-cation, 2008, American English, a word from the "Great Recession" of that year, from stay (v.1) + ending from vacation.

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beluga (n.)

1590s, from Russian beluga, literally "great white," from belo- "white" (from PIE *bhel-o-, suffixed form of root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn," also "shining white") + augmentative suffix -uga. Originally the great white sturgeon, found in the Caspian and Black seas; later (1817) the popular name for the small white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) found in northern seas.

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ample (adj.)

mid-15c., "great, abundant," especially "sufficient for any purpose," from Old French ample "large, wide, vast, great" (12c.), from Latin amplus "large, spacious; abundant, numerous; magnificent, distinguished," which is related to ampla "handle, grip; opportunity," from Proto-Italic *amlo- "seizable," from a PIE root meaning "to grab" that also is postulated as the source of amare "to love" (see Amy).

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arcanum (n.)

"a secret, a mystery," proper singular form of arcana (q.v.); in alchemy, a supposed great secret of nature, hence, generally, "the secret virtue" of anything.

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firetrap (n.)

also fire-trap, "place at great risk of destruction by fire and with insufficient means of escape," 1882, from fire (n.) + trap (n.).

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aggrandize (v.)

1630s, "to make larger, increase," from French agrandiss-, present-participle stem of agrandir "to augment, enlarge" (16c.), ultimately from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + grandire "to make great," from grandis "big, great; full, abundant" (see grand (adj.)). The double -g- spelling in English (also formerly in French) is by analogy with Latin words in ad-. Related: Aggrandized; aggrandizing.

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Alexandria 

city in Egypt, founded 332 B.C.E. by Alexander the Great, for whom it is named. Also see -ia. Related: Alexandrian.

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British (adj.)

Old English Bryttisc "of or relating to (ancient) Britons," from Bryttas "natives of ancient Britain" (see Briton). The meaning "of or pertaining to Great Britain" is from c. 1600; the noun meaning "inhabitants of Great Britain" is from 1640s. British Empire is from c. 1600. First modern record of British Isles is from 1620s. British English as the form of the English language spoken in Britain is by 1862 (George P. Marsh). Related: Britishness.

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multitude (n.)

"a great number regarded collectively; a crowd or throng; the characteristic of being many, numerousness," early 14c., from Old French multitude (12c.) and directly from Latin multitudinem (nominative multitudo) "a great number, a crowd; the crowd, the common people," from multus "many, much" (see multi-) + suffix -tudo (see -tude). Related: Multitudes.

A multitude, however great, may be in a space so large as to give each one ample room; a throng or a crowd is generally smaller than a multitude, but is gathered into a close body, a throng being a company that presses together or forward, and a crowd carrying the closeness to uncomfortable physical contact. [Century Dictionary]
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