Etymology
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monotheistic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to monotheism; believing that there is but one god," 1805, from monotheist + -ic.

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Tuesday (n.)

third day of the week, Old English tiwesdæg, from Tiwes, genitive of Tiw "Tiu," from Proto-Germanic *Tiwaz "god of the sky," the original supreme deity of ancient Germanic mythology, differentiated specifically as Tiu, ancient Germanic god of war, from PIE *deiwos "god," from root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god." Cognate with Old Frisian tiesdei, Old Norse tysdagr, Swedish tisdag, Old High German ziestag.

The day name (second element dæg, see day) is a translation of Latin dies Martis (source of Italian martedi, French Mardi) "Day of Mars," from the Roman god of war, who was identified with Germanic Tiw (though etymologically Tiw is related to Zeus), itself a loan-translation of Greek Areos hēmera. In cognate German Dienstag and Dutch Dinsdag, the first element would appear to be Germanic ding, þing "public assembly," but it is now thought to be from Thinxus, one of the names of the war-god in Latin inscriptions.

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enthusiasm (n.)
Origin and meaning of enthusiasm

c. 1600, from French enthousiasme (16c.) and directly from Late Latin enthusiasmus, from Greek enthousiasmos "divine inspiration, enthusiasm (produced by certain kinds of music, etc.)," from enthousiazein "be inspired or possessed by a god, be rapt, be in ecstasy," from entheos "divinely inspired, possessed by a god," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts). It acquired a derogatory sense of "excessive religious emotion through the conceit of special revelation from God" (1650s) under the Puritans; generalized meaning "fervor, zeal" (the main modern sense) is first recorded 1716.

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monotheist (n.)

"one who believes that there is but one god," 1670s, from monotheism + -ist.

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Bacchus 

Greek god of wine and revelry, a later name of Dionysus, late 15c., from Latin Bacchus, from Greek Bakkhos, which is perhaps related to Latin bacca "berry, fruit of a tree or shrub" (see bay (n.4)), or from an Asian language. He was perhaps originally a Thracian fertility god.

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bismillah (interj.)

first attested in English in Byron, from Arabic bi'smillah(i) "in the name of God" (Allah).

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joss (n.)

"Chinese figure of a deity," 1711, from Chinese Pidgin English, from Javanese dejos, a word formed 16c. from Portuguese deus "god," from Latin deus (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"). Colloquially, it came to mean "luck." Joss-stick "Chinese incense" first recorded 1831.

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theocracy (n.)
Origin and meaning of theocracy

1737; earlier as un-Latinized theocraty (1620s), "form of government in which God is recognized as supreme ruler and his laws form the statute book," originally of the sacerdotal government of Israel before the rise of kings, from later Greek theokratia (Josephus), literally "the rule of God," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + kratos "a rule, regime, strength" (see -cracy). Meaning "priestly or religious body wielding political and civil power" is recorded from 1825. Related: Theocratic (1741).

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ungodly (adj.)

late 14c., "irreligious, not god-fearing, not in accordance with the laws of God," from un- (1) "not" + godly (adj.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ongodelijc, German ungöttlich, Middle Swedish ogudhlik. Colloquial sense of "extremely annoying" is recorded from 1887.

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Ra 

"hawk-headed sovereign sun god of Egyptian mythology," from Egyptian R' "sun, day."

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