Etymology
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abstainer (n.)
mid-15c., "one who practices self-denial," agent noun from abstain. Modern use in the temperance movement and specifically with reference to alcoholic drink is from 1862. French used abstème in this sense, from Latin abstemius.
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nineties (n.)

1857 as the years of someone's life between 90 and 99; from 1848 as the tenth decade of years in a given century; 1849 with reference to Fahrenheit temperature. See ninety.

Many still live who remember those days; if the old men cannot tell you the exact date, they will say: 'It were in the nineties;' (etc.) [Chambers's Journal, Nov. 1, 1856]

Related: Ninetyish "characteristic of the (eighteen-) nineties" (1909). In Britain, the naughty nineties was a popular name 1920s-30s for the 1890s, based on the notion of a relaxing of morality and mood in contrast to earlier Victorian times. In U.S., gay nineties in reference to the same decade is attested from 1927, and was the title of a regular nostalgia feature in "Life" magazine about that time.

The long, dreary blue-law Sunday afternoons were periods of the Nineties which no amount of rosy retrospect will ever be able to recall as gay, especially to a normal healthy boy to whom all activities were taboo except G. A. Henty and the bound volumes of Leslie's Weekly of the Civil War. [Life magazine, Sept. 1, 1927]
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kinematics (n.)

"the science of motion," 1840, from French cinématique (Ampère, 1834), from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion." Related: Kinematic (adj.), 1846; kinematical; kinematically.

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recoil (n.)

c. 1300, "a retreat, a drawing back" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French recul "recoil, backward movement, retreat," from reculer (see recoil (v.)). Meaning "back-kick of a firearm or piece of ordnance when discharged" is from 1570s.

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isthmus (n.)
1550s, from Latin isthmus, from Greek isthmos "narrow passage, narrow neck of land between two seas," originally especially that of Corinth, a word of unknown origin. Perhaps from eimi "to go" + suffix -thmo (compare ithma "a step, movement").
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exurb (n.)
"the outer, prosperous ring of the suburbs," 1955, American English, from exurban (adj.), by 1838 (it seems to have arisen in the writings of the reform movement opposed to urban cemeteries), from ex- + urban, on model of suburban. Related: Exurbanite; exurbia.
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Esalen 
1966 in reference to an alternative philosophy and human potential movement, from Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, U.S., from Esselen, name of an extinct Native American people of the California coast, for which Bright gives no etymology.
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artsy (adj.)
"pretentiously artistic," 1902, from arts (see art (n.)); originally artsy-craftsy, with reference to the arts and crafts movement; always more or less dismissive or pejorative; artsy-fartsy was in use by 1971.
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sag (n.)

"a bending or drooping," 1580s, in nautical use, "movement to leeward," from sag (v.). From 1727 in American English in reference to landforms having a sunken look. By 1861 in reference to droop from slackness in wires, cables, etc.

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stir (n.)
"commotion, disturbance, tumult," late 14c. (in phrase on steir), probably from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse styrr "disturbance, tumult," from the same root as stir (v.)). The sense of "movement, bustle" (1560s) probably is from the English verb.
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