Etymology
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-i (1)
as a termination in certain people names (Iraqi, Israeli), it represents the common Semitic national designation suffix -i.
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dextrous (adj.)
1620s, alternative spelling of dexterous; this version is more conformable to Latin but less common in English.
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ridley 

type of sea-turtle, by 1942, from a common name of the animals in the Florida Keys, but the word is of unknown origin.

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cockchafer (n.)

popular name of a common European beetle, the May-beetle, 1690s, from cock (n.1), in reference to its size, + chafer "beetle."

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hair-trigger (n.)

1795; Figurative use by 1841. Hair perhaps in reference to the slight pressure required to activate it.

The difference between a hair-trigger and a common trigger is this—the hair-trigger, when set, lets off the cock by the slightest touch, whereas the common trigger requires a considerable degree of force, and consequently is longer in its operation. [Charles James, "Military Dictionary," London, 1802]
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B.C.E. 
initialism (acronym) for "Before Common Era" or "Before Christian Era," 1881; see C.E. A secular alternative to B.C.
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planktology (n.)

"scientific study of plankton," 1892, from German planktologie (1891); see plankton + -logy. The native formation planktonology (1896) is less common.

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POW (n.)
also P.O.W., initialism (acronym) for prisoner of war, coined 1919 but not common until World War II.
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Carol 
masc. proper name, from Medieval Latin Carolus, which is of Germanic origin, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). As a fem. proper name, an abbreviation of Caroline. The masc. name never has been popular in U.S.; the fem. form was common after c. 1900 and was a top-10 name for U.S. girls born 1936-1950.
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regrettable (adj.)

c. 1600, "deserving of regret, calling for regret," from regret + -able. "Common in recent use" [OED]. Related: Regrettably.

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