Etymology
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upend (v.)
also up-end, "set on end," 1823, from up + end. Related: Upended; upending.
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retrousse (adj.)

"turned up (of the nose), pug," 1802, from French (nez) retroussé (16c.), past-participle adjective from retrousser "to turn up."

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upwind (adv.)
also up-wind, 1838, from up (adv.) + wind (n.1). Originally a nautical term. As an adjective from 1892.
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upgather (v.)
also up-gather, 1580s, from verbal phrase, from up (adv.) + gather (v.). Related: Upgathered; upgathering.
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summation (n.)
1760, "process of calculating a sum," from Modern Latin summationem (nominative summatio) "an adding up," noun of action from Late Latin summatus, past participle of summare "to sum up," from Latin summa (see sum (n.)). Meaning "a summing up" is from 1836.
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balloon (v.)
1792, "to go up in a balloon;" 1841, "to swell, puff up;" from balloon (n.). Related: Ballooned; ballooning.
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upgrade (n.)
also up-grade, 1847, "upward slope," from up (adj.) + grade (n.). The meaning "upgraded version" is recorded from 1980.
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upfront (adj.)
1932, up front "in the front," from up + front (n.). Meaning "honest, open" is from 1970; that of "paid in advance" is from 1967.
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uptake (n.)
"capacity for understanding, perceptive power," 1816, from up (adv.) + take (v.). Compare Middle English verb uptake "to pick or take up" (c. 1300). Meaning "pipe leading up from the smoke box of a steam boiler to the chimney" is from 1839.
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breakup (n.)
also break-up, "a disruption, dissolution of connection, separation of a mass into parts," 1795, from verbal expression break up "separate, dissolve" (mid-15c.); see break (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase was used of plowland, later of groups, assemblies, etc.; of things (also of marriages, relationships), from mid-18c. Break it up as a command to stop a fight, etc., is recorded from 1936.
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