Etymology
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innovative (adj.)

"tending to bring in something new; introducing or tending to introduce innovations; characterized by innovations," 1796 (with an isolated use from c. 1600); see innovate + -ive. Related: Innovatively; innovativeness.

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inedita (n.)
"unpublished writings," Modern Latin noun use of neuter plural of Latin ineditus, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + editus, past participle of edere "to bring forth, produce" (see edition).
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resettle (v.)

"settle again," 1540s (transitive), in reference to places, from re- "back, again" + settle (v.). Intransitive sense of "become settled again" is from 1821. The meaning "bring into order again" is from 1610s. Related: Resettled; resettling.

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affiliate (v.)
1761, "bring into close association," from Latin affiliatus, past participle of affiliare "to adopt a son," from ad "to" (see ad-) + filius "son" (see filial). Outside legal use, always figurative. Related: Affiliated; affiliating.
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relate (v.)

1520s, "to recount, tell," from French relater "refer, report" (14c.) and directly from Latin relatus, used as past participle of referre "bring back, bear back" (see refer), from re- "back, again" + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)).

The meaning "stand in some relation; have reference or respect" is from 1640s; transitive sense of "bring (something) into relation with (something else)" is from 1690s. Meaning "to establish a relation between" is from 1771. Sense of "to feel connected or sympathetic to" is attested from 1950, originally in psychology jargon. Related: Related; relating.

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opprobrious (adj.)

"full of reproach, intended to bring disgrace" (of language, words, etc.), late 14c., from Old French oprobrieus (Modern French opprobrieux) and directly from Late Latin opprobriosus, from Latin opprobare "to reproach, taunt," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, before" (see ob-) + probrum "reproach, infamy," from Proto-Italic *profro-, from PIE *probhro- "what is brought up" (against someone, as a reproach), from root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children." Compare Sanskrit prabhar-, Avestan frabar- "to bring, offer." The etymological sense is "disgrace attached to conduct considered shameful." Related: Opprobriously; opprobriousness.

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induce (v.)

formerly also enduce, late 14c., "to lead by persuasions or other influences," from Latin inducere "lead into, bring in, introduce, conduct; persuade; suppose, imagine," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Meaning "to bring about" in any way (in reference to a trance, a fever, etc.) is from early 15c.; sense of "to infer by reasoning" is from 1560s. Electro-magnetic sense first recorded 1777. Related: Induced; inducing.

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-phyte 
word-forming element meaning "plant, plant characteristic; planting, growth; abnormal growth," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."
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rapprochement (n.)

"establishment of cordial relations," 1809, from French rapprochement "reunion, reconciliation," literally "a bringing near," from rapprocher "bring near," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + aprocher (see approach (v.)). Generally in italics until 1880s.

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developer (n.)

1833, "one who or that which develops," agent noun from develop. Photography use in reference to the chemical bath used to bring out the latent image is attested from 1869; meaning "speculative builder" is by 1938.

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