Etymology
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boodle (n.)

1833, "crowd;" 1858, "phony money," especially "graft money," actual or potential (1883), both American English slang, either or both based on bundle (n.), or from Dutch boedel "property, riches," which is from Proto-Germanic *bothla, from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

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displacement (n.)

1610s, "removal from office;" see displace + -ment. As "quantity of a liquid displaced by a solid body put into it," 1809. Physics sense "amount by which anything is displaced" is from 1837.

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slight (n.)

1550s, "small amount or weight," from slight (v.). Meaning "act of intentional neglect or ignoring out of displeasure or contempt" is from 1701, probably via 17c. phrase make a slight of (1610s).

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finances (n.)

"pecuniary resources, funds in money," 1730, modeled on the French cognate, from plural of finance (n.).

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economy (adj.)

1821 as a term in advertising, at first meant simply "cheaper," then "bigger and thus cheaper per unit or amount" (1950). See economy (n.).

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increment (n.)

mid-15c., "act or process of increasing," from Latin incrementum "growth, increase; an addition," from stem of increscere "to grow in or upon" (see increase (v.)). Meaning "amount of increase" first attested 1630s.

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grist-mill (n.)

also gristmill, c. 1600, from grist (n.) in the sense "amount ground at one time," hence "grain carried to the mill by the owner for grinding at one time," + mill (n.).

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exorbitance (n.)

mid-15c., exorbitaunce, "a deviation from what is right, a transgression of normal limitations" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from exorbitant + -ance. Sense of "extravagance in degree or amount, excessiveness" is from 1640s. Related: Exorbitancy.

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Aceldama 

late 14c., name of the potter's field near Jerusalem that was purchased with the money Judas Iscariot took to betray Jesus, literally "place of bloodshed," from Greek Akeldama, rendering an Aramaic (Semitic) name akin to Syriac haqal dema "the field of blood." So called for being purchased with the blood-money.

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Shylock (n.)

"usurer, merciless creditor," 1786, from the name of the Jewish money-lender character in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (c. 1596).

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