Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
Welshman (n.)

Old English Wilisc mon; see Welsh + man (n.).

Related entries & more 
rarebit (n.)

1785, an absurd perversion of (Welsh) rabbit, as if from rare (adj.) + bit (n.). See Welsh.

Related entries & more 
welch (v.)

1857, racing slang, "to refuse or avoid payment of money laid as a bet," probably a disparaging use of the national name Welsh. Related: Welched; welching.

Related entries & more 
Rotwelsch (n.)

German word for the jargon of thieves and vagabonds, 1841, from German Rotwelsch, literally "Red Welsh," from rot "red" (see red (adj.1)) + Welsh because (to a German-speaker) it would seem obscure and difficult. The first element rather might be connected with Middle High German rot "beggar."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Vlach (n.)

"member of a Latin-speaking race of the Balkans, a Walachian or Rumanian," 1841, from Bulgarian vlakh or Serbian vlah, from Old Church Slavonic vlakhu, a Slavic adoptation of Germanic *walh (source of Old English wealh) "foreigner," especially applied to Celts and Latins (see Welsh).

Related entries & more 
walnut (n.)

Old English walhnutu "nut of the walnut tree," literally "foreign nut," from wealh "foreign" (see Welsh) + hnutu (see nut). Compare Old Norse valhnot, Middle Low German walnut, Middle Dutch walnote, Dutch walnoot, German Walnuss. So called because it was introduced from Gaul and Italy, distinguishing it from the native hazel nut. Compare the Late Latin name for it, nux Gallica, literally "Gaulish nut." Applied to the tree itself from 1600 (earlier walnut tree, c. 1400).

Related entries & more 
jew (v.)

"to cheat, to drive a hard bargain," 1824, from Jew (n.) (compare gyp, welsh, etc.). "Though now commonly employed without direct reference to the Jews as a race, it is regarded by them as offensive and opprobrious" [Century Dictionary, 1902]. The campaign to eliminate it in early 20c. was so successful that people also began to avoid the noun and adjective, using Hebrew instead.

Now I'll say 'a Jew' and just the word Jew sounds like a dirty word and people don't know whether to laugh or not. [Lenny Bruce, "How to Talk Dirty and Influence People," 1965]
Related entries & more 
Eisteddfod (n.)

"annual assembly of Welsh bards," 1822, from Welsh eisteddfod "congress of bards or literati," literally "a session, a sitting," from eistedd "to sit" (from sedd "seat," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit") + bod "to be" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). The Welsh plural is eisteddfodau.

Related entries & more 
Vaughan 

from Welsh fychan, mutation of bychan "small."

Related entries & more