Etymology
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runs (n.)

by 1962 in the runs "an attack of diarrhea;" see run (v.).

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mudder (n.)
"horse that runs well in muddy conditions," 1903, from mud (n.).
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sandpiper (n.)

common name of a small wading bird that runs along the sand and utters a piping note, 1670s, from sand (n.) + piper.

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gauntlet (n.2)
military punishment in which offender runs between rows of men who beat him in passing; see gantlet.
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Balkan (adj.)
1835, "of or pertaining to the Balkans" (q.v.) or to the mountain range that runs across them.
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Moravia 

region in central Europe, Medieval Latin, named for the River Morva (German March, Latin Marus), which runs through it.

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front-runner (n.)
also frontrunner, of political candidates, 1908, American English, a metaphor from horse racing (where it is used by 1901 of a horse that runs best while in the lead).
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plywood (n.)

"board made of two or more thin layers of wood bonded together and arranged so that the grain of one runs at right angles to that of the next," 1907, from ply (n.) + wood (n.).

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Nigeria 

West African nation, named for river Niger, which runs through it, + country name ending -ia. Related: Nigerian.

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Aragon 

medieval northern Spanish kingdom, named for a river that runs through it, probably from a PIE root meaning "water." Related: Aragonese (late 14c., Arragounneys); Middle English also had a noun Aragoner.

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