Etymology
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interpunction (n.)

"punctuation, a point inserted in writing," 1610s, from Latin interpunctionem (nominative interpunctio) "a putting of points between (words), division by points," noun of action from past participle stem of interpungere "to put points between," from inter "between" (see inter-) + pungere "to prick, pierce" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick").

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polycentric (adj.)

"having several centers or nuclear points," 1826, from poly- + -centric.

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penholder (n.)

"a holder for pens or pen-points," 1815, from pen (n.1) + holder.

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punctator (n.)

"one who inserts the vowel points in (Hebrew) writing," 1723, from Latin punctum "a point" (from nasalized form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). 

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orientation (n.)

1839, "arrangement (of a building, etc.) to face east or any other specified direction," noun of action from orient (v.). Meaning "process of determining the points of the compass is by 1868, hence the extended sense of "action of determining one's mental bearings," with reference to new ideas, etc. (1870). Meaning "introduction to a situation" is from 1942. Sense of "the position or arrangement (of something) relative to the points of the compass" is from 1875. Related: Orientational.

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pedagogic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a teacher of children," 1781, from Latin paedagogicus, from Greek paidagōgikos "suitable for a teacher," from paidagōgos "teacher of children" (see pedagogue). Earlier (1755) in reference to the points used in printing Hebrew and Greek letters.

Lastly, we observe, that Hebrew being a Sacred language, is chiefly studied by Divines, who often make use of Points in Theological writings; tho' plain Hebrew as well as Greek, are understood and very frequently printed without Points or Accents. But that the use of such Pedagogic Symbols will one time cease, is the hope of all that delight in beholding neat Letter disrobed of all intruders upon its native beauty. [John Smith, "The Printer's Grammar," London, 1755]
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similarity (n.)

"state, quality, or condition of being similar," 1660s, from similar + -ity, or from French similarité. Related: Similarities "points of resemblance" (1838).

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wraith (n.)

1510s, "ghost," Scottish, of uncertain origin. Weekley and Century Dictionary suggest Old Norse vorðr "guardian" in the sense of "guardian angel." Klein points to Gaelic and Irish arrach "specter, apparition."

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potentiometer (n.)

"instrument for measuring the difference of electrical potential between two points," 1868, a hybrid formed from combining form of Latin potentia "power" (see potential) + Greek-derived -meter. Related: Potentiometric.

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axonometric (adj.)

1869, from axonometry "art of making a perspective representation of figures based on coordinate points" (1865), from Greek axon "axis, axle" (see axis) + metria "a measuring of" (see -metry).

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