Etymology
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nonsense (n.)

"that which is lacking in sense, language or words without meaning or conveying absurd or ridiculous ideas," 1610s, from non- "not" + sense (n.); perhaps influenced by French nonsens. Since mid-20c., non-sense, with the hyphen, has been used to distinguish the meaning "that which is not sense, that which is different from sense," not implying absurdity.

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nonsensical (adj.)

"of the nature of nonsense, absurd, foolish," 1650s, from nonsense + -ical. Related: Nonsensically.

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no-nonsense (adj.)

"not tolerating foolishness, practical," by 1912, from the phrase to stand no nonsense "tolerate no foolishness or extravagant conduct," which is attested from 1821, originally in sporting slang.

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horsefeathers (n.)

"nonsense," 1927, said to have been coined by U.S. cartoonist Billy De Beck; perhaps a variant of horseshit "nonsense," though the latter is attested in print only from 1940s.

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blather (n.)

"nonsense, foolish talk," 1787, blether, from blather (v.).

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hooey (n.)

"nonsense, foolishness," 1922, American English slang, of unknown origin.

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twaddle (n.)

"silly talk, prosy nonsense," 1782, probably from twattle (1550s), of obscure origin.

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workmanlike (adj.)

"efficient, no-nonsense," 1739, from workman + like (adj.).

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diddums 

nonsense word used as an expression to a baby, attested by 1888; of no etymology.

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guff (n.)

"empty talk, nonsense," 1888, from earlier sense of "puff of air" (1825), of imitative origin.

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