Etymology
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nominative (adj.)

late 14c., nominatif, "pertaining to the grammatical case dealing with the subject of a verb," from Old French nominatif, from Latin nominativus "pertaining to naming, serving to name" (in casus nominativus), from nominat-, past-participle stem of nominare "to name, call by name, give a name to," from nomen "name" (see name (n.)). As a noun, "the nominative case" (1610s); "a nominative word" (1660s).

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subluxation (n.)
"partial dislocation," 1680s, from Latin subluxationem (nominative subluxatio).
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biped (n.)
"animal with two feet," 1640s, from Latin bipedem (nominative bipes) "two-footed," as a plural noun, "men;" from bi- "two" (see bi-) + pedem (nominative pes) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). As an adjective from 1781.
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sanctitude (n.)
mid-15c., from Latin sanctitudinem (nominative sanctitudo) "sacredness," from sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)).
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supremacy (n.)
1540s, from supreme + -acy, or from Latin supremitatem (nominative supremitas). Supremity in same sense is from 1530s.
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vermiculation (n.)
1610s, from Latin vermiculationem (nominative vermiculatio), noun of action from vermiculari, from vermiculus (see vermicular).
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evident (adj.)

"plainly seen or perceived, manifest, obvious," late 14c., from Old French evident and directly from Latin evidentem (nominative evidens) "perceptible, clear, obvious, apparent" from ex "out, out of, fully" (see ex-) + videntem (nominative videns), present participle of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see").

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malevolent (adj.)

"having an evil disposition toward another or others, wishing evil to others," c. 1500, from Old French malivolent and directly from Latin malevolentem (nominative malevolens) "ill-disposed, spiteful, envious," from male "badly" (see mal-) + volentem (nominative volens), present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)). Related: Malevolently.

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emanant (n.)
1852, in mathematics, from Latin emanantem (nominative emanans), present participle of emanare (see emanate).
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vitality (n.)
1590s, from Latin vitalitatem (nominative vitalitas) "vital force, life," from vitalis "pertaining to life" (see vital).
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