Etymology
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Middletown 

"typical U.S. middle class community," 1929, from the title of a book published that year ("Middletown: A Study in Contemporary American Culture") by New York sociologists Robert and Helen Lynd, based on information collected 1924-25 in Muncie, Indiana. The U.S. Geological Survey lists 40 towns by that name, not counting variant spellings; see middle (adj.) + town.

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Midas 

ancient king of Phrygia, 1560s; the name is of Phrygian origin.  He was given by the gods the gift of turning all he touched to gold, but as this included his food he had to beg them to take it back again. Hence Midas touch (1883). But the oldest references to him in English are to the unrelated story of the ass's ears given him by Apollo for being dull to the charms of his lyre.

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Garrett 

surname, from mid-13c., from Gerald or Gerard, with loss of consonant.

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Parker 

surname, literally "the keeper of a park," mid-12c.; see park (n.).  

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Cepheus 

ancient, dim northern constellation, mid-15c., Cephe, from Latin Cepheus, from Greek Kepheus, name of a mythical king of Ethiopia, husband of Cassiopeia, father of Andromeda.

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Alcoran (n.)

older form of Koran, mid-14c., from Old French alcoran, from Arabic al-quran "the Koran," literally "the Book," with the definite article (al-) taken in European languages as part of the name.

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Disney 

surname attested from mid-12c. (William de Ysini), from Isigny in the Calvados region of Normandy. Disneyesque, in reference to the cartooning style of U.S. animator and producer Walt Disney (1901-1966), is attested by 1939.

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Che 

nickname of Argentine Marxist revolutionary Ernesto Guevara (1928-1967), given to him by Cuban exiles in Guatemala in mid-1950s, from his dialectal use of Argentine che, a slang filler word in speech.

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Bernicia 

Anglo-Saxon kingdom in northernmost England, founded by mid-6c., eventually merged into Northumbria; the name evidently is a survival of a pre-invasion Celtic name, perhaps that represented by the Welsh Bryneich. Related: Berenician

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Jeff (n.)

shortened or familiar form of masc. proper name Jeffrey; in early to mid-20c., sometimes used by African-Americans to indicate a Southern rural poor white person, probably from Jeff Davis, president of the Confederate States of America.

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