Etymology
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liable (adj.)

mid-15c., "bound or obliged by law," from Old French lier, liier "to bind, tie up, fasten, tether; bind by obligation" (12c.), from Latin ligare "to bind, to tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). With -able.

Perhaps it is from an Anglo-French *liable, or from an unattested word in Old French or Medieval Latin. The general sense of "exposed to" (something undesirable) is attested by 1590s. The unetymological use for "likely" is attested by 1850.

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liability (n.)
1790, originally a term in law; "condition of being legally liable" (the sense in limited liability); see liable + -ity. General sense is from 1809; meaning "thing for which one is liable" is first attested 1842. Related: Liabilities.
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uncontroverted (adj.)
"not liable to be called into question," 1640s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of controvert (v.).
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chargeable (adj.)

late 15c., "burdensome," from charge (v.) + -able. Sense of "subject to a tax or payment" is from 1610s; that of "liable to be made an expense" is from 1640s; that of "liable to be charged" (with an offense, etc.) is from 1660s. Related: Chargeability.

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dubitable (adj.)

"liable to be doubted," 1620s, from French dubitable, from Latin dubitabilis "doubtful," from dubitare "hesitate, doubt" (see doubt (v.)). Related: Dubitably.

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objectionable (adj.)

"justly liable to objection, calling for disapproval," 1779, from objection + -able. Related: Objectionably.

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fragile (adj.)
Origin and meaning of fragile

1510s, "liable to sin, morally weak;" c. 1600, "liable to break;" a back-formation from fragility, or else from French fragile (Old French fragele, 14c.), from Latin fragilis "easily broken," from root of frangere "to break" (from PIE root *bhreg- "to break"). Transferred sense of "of frail constitution" (of persons) is from 1858.

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miffy (adj.)

"liable to 'take a miff,' " 1700, from miff (n.) + -y (2). Related: Miffiness.

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punishable (adj.)

early 15c., punysshable, of persons, "liable to legal punishment, deserving of being punished;" also of offenses or sins, from punish + -able. Related: Punishability.

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attachable (adj.)
1570s, "liable to arrest," from attach + -able. Meaning "capable of being tacked on" is attested by 1856.
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