Etymology
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ion (n.)

1834, introduced by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday (suggested by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath), coined from Greek ion, neuter present participle of ienai "go," from PIE root *ei- "to go." So called because ions move toward the electrode of opposite charge.

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ionic (adj.)

"pertaining to ions," 1890, from ion + -ic.

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-on 

subatomic particle suffix, from ion.

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indirection (n.)

"irregular means, deceitful action," 1590s, from indirect + -ion.

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ionosphere (n.)

region of the outer atmosphere, 1926, from ion + sphere. Coined by Scottish radar pioneer Robert A. Watson-Watt (1892-1973). So called because it contains many ions.

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flocculation (n.)

"the union of small particles into granular aggregates," 1875, from flocculate + -ion.

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-ation 

the end of some nouns of action; see -ate + -ion.

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prospection (n.)

"act of looking forward or into the distance," 1660s; see prospect (n.) + -ion.

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levitation (n.)

1660s, noun of action from Latin levitas "lightness" (see levitate) + -ion.

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