Etymology
Advertisement
infinite (adj.)
late 14c., "eternal, limitless," also "extremely great in number," from Old French infinit "endless, boundless" and directly from Latin infinitus "unbounded, unlimited, countless, numberless," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + finitus "defining, definite," from finis "end" (see finish (v.)). The noun meaning "that which is infinite" is from 1580s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
infinitesimal (adj.)
1710 (1650s as a noun), "infinitely small, less than any assignable quantity," from Modern Latin infinitesimus, from Latin infinitus "infinite" (see infinite) + ordinal word-forming element -esimus, as in centesimus "hundredth." Related: Infinitesimally.
Related entries & more 
ad infinitum 
"endlessly," Latin, literally "to infinity" from ad "to, unto" (see ad-) + infinitum "infinity," neuter accusative of adjective infinitus "endless" (see infinite). English version to infinity is attested from 1630s.
Related entries & more 
infinitude (n.)
1640s, from Medieval Latin *infinitudo, from Latin infinitus (see infinite) on model of multitudo, magnitudo. Or the English word is perhaps from or modeled on French infinitude (1610s).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
infinity (n.)
late 14c., from Old French infinité "infinity; very large number or quantity" (13c.), from Latin infinitatem (nominative infinitas) "boundlessness, endlessness," from infinitus boundless, unlimited" (see infinite). Latin infinitas was used as a loan-translation of Greek apeiria "infinity," from apeiros "endless."
Related entries & more 
infinitive (n.)
"simple, uninflected form of a verb, expressing its general sense," 1510s, from earlier use as an adjective (mid-15c.), from Late Latin infinitivus "unlimited, indefinite," from Latin infinitus "not limited" (see infinite). "Indefinite" because not restricted by person or number. Related: Infinitival; infinitively.
Related entries & more 
omniscience (n.)

"infinite knowledge, the quality or attribute of fully knowing all things," 1610s, from Medieval Latin omniscientia "all-knowledge," from Latin omnis "all" (see omni-) + scientia "knowledge" (see science).

Related entries & more 
omnipotent (adj.)

early 14c., "almighty, possessing infinite power," from Old French omnipotent "almighty, all-powerful" (11c.) and directly from Latin omnipotentem (nominative omnipotens) "all-powerful, almighty," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + potens (genitive potentis) "powerful" (see potent). Originally of God or a deity; general sense of "having absolute power or authority" is attested from 1590s. Related: Omnipotently.

Related entries & more 
eternity (n.)

late 14c., "quality of being eternal," from Old French eternité "eternity, perpetuity" (12c.), from Latin aeternitatem (nominative aeternitas), from aeternus "enduring, permanent," contraction of aeviternus "of great age," from aevum "age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity").  Meaning "infinite time" is from 1580s. In the Mercian hymns, Latin aeternum is glossed by Old English ecnisse.

Related entries & more