Etymology
Advertisement
glide (n.)

1580s, from glide (v.). From 1835 as a term in music; from 1889 as a step in dancing or a type of dance.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glide (v.)

Old English glidan "move along smoothly and easily; glide away, vanish; slip, slide" (class I strong verb, past tense glad, past participle gliden), from Proto-Germanic *glidan "to glide" (source also of Old Saxon glidan, Old Frisian glida, Old High German glitan, German gleiten), probably part of the large group of Germanic words in gl- involving notions of "smooth; shining; joyful," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine." Related: Glided; gliding. Strong past tense form glid persisted into 20c.

Related entries & more 
glider (n.)

mid-15c., "person or thing that glides," agent noun from glide. Meaning "motorless airplane" is c. 1897.

Related entries & more 
glissade (n.)

in dancing, 1843, from French glissade, from glisser "to slip, slide" (13c.), from Frankish *glidan or some other Germanic source (cognate with Dutch glissen), from Proto-Germanic *glidan "to glide" (see glide (v.)). Earlier in English as a verb (1832).

Related entries & more 
glitch (n.)

by 1953, said to have been in use in radio broadcast jargon since early 1940s, American English, possibly from Yiddish glitsh "a slip," from glitshn "to slip," from German glitschen, and related gleiten "to glide" (see glide (v.)). Perhaps directly from German. Apparently it began as technical jargon among radio and television engineers, but was popularized and given a broader meaning c. 1962 by the U.S. space program.

No more a-c power line "glitches" (horizontal-bar interference)—because camera filaments are operated from a separate d-c source. [RCA ad for the TK-11A studio television camera in Broadcasting Telecasting magazine, Jan. 12, 1953]
All you get today is "glitch" wherever splicing occurs. "Glitch" is slang for the "momentary jiggle" that occurs at the editing point if the sync pulses don't match exactly in the splice. [Sponsor, Volume 13, June 20, 1959]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hang-glider (n.)

type of engineless flying machine, 1930, popular as a recreation from 1971; see hang (v.) + glider. Hang-gliding (n.) is from 1971; hang-glide (v.) is from 1986.

Related entries & more 
elapse (v.)

"to slide, slip, or glide away; pass away with or as if with a continuous gliding motion," used of time, 1640s, from French elapser, from Latin elapsus, past participle of elabi "slip or glide away, escape," from ex "out, out of, away" (see ex-) + labi "to slip, glide" (see lapse (n.)). The noun now corresponding to elapse is lapse, but elapse (n.) was in recent use. Related: Elapsed; elapsing.

Related entries & more 
scree (n.)

"pile of debris at the base of a cliff or steep mountainside," 1781, a back-formation from screes (plural) "pebbles, small stones," from Old Norse skriða "landslide." This is from the verb skriða "to creep, crawl;" of a ship, "to sail, glide," also "to slide" (on snow-shoes), from Proto-Germanic *skreithanan (source also of Old English scriþan "to go, glide," Old Saxon skridan, Dutch schrijden, Old High German scritan, German schreiten "to stride").

Related entries & more 
slick (v.)

Old English -slician (in nigslicod "newly made sleek"), from Proto-Germanic *slikojan, from base *slikaz (source also of Old Norse slikr "smooth," Old High German slihhan "to glide," German schleichen "to creep, crawl, sneak," Dutch slijk "mud, mire"), from PIE *sleig- "to smooth, glide, be muddy," from root *(s)lei- "slimy" (see slime (n.)). Related: Slicked; slicking.

Related entries & more 
skate (v.)

1690s, "to ice-skate, glide over the ice on skates," from skate (n.2). U.S. slang sense of "to get away with something" is attested from 1945. Related: Skated; skating.

Related entries & more