Etymology
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excessive (adj.)

"exceeding the usual or proper limit, degree, measure, or proportion; going beyond what is sanctioned by correct principles; immoderate; extravagant; unreasonable;" late 14c., from Old French excessif "excessive, oppressive," from Latin excess-, past-participle stem of excedere "to depart, go beyond" (see exceed). Related: Excessively; excessiveness.

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zealotry (n.)
"excessive or undue zeal, fanaticism," 1650s, from zealot + -ry.
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extortionate (adj.)

"characterized by extortion, oppressive, excessive," 1711, from extortion + -ate. Extortious is from c. 1600.

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intemperate (adj.)
"characterized by excessive indulgence in a passion or appetite," late 14c., from Latin intemperatus "excessive, immoderate," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + temperatus "restrained, regulated, limited, moderate, sober, calm, steady," past participle of temperare "to moderate" (see temper (v.)). Related: Intemperately.
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lambdacism (n.)
excessive use of the letter -l-, 1650s in writing, 1864 in pronunciation, from lambda + -ism.
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overcorrection (n.)

also over-correction, "an excessive or too frequent correction," 1828, from over- + correction.

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nicotinism 

"morbid effects of excessive use of tobacco," by 1873, from nicotine + -ism.

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overdose (n.)

1700, "an excessive or too large dose," from over- + dose (n.).

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caffeinism (n.)
"morbid state produced by prolonged or excessive exposure to caffeine," 1880, from caffeine + -ism.
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immoderation (n.)
early 15c., from Latin immoderationem (nominative immoderatio) "want of moderation, excess," from immoderatus "unrestrained, excessive" (see immoderate).
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