Etymology
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epithet (n.)

"descriptive name for a person or thing," 1570s, from French épithète or directly from Latin epitheton (source also of Spanish epíteto, Portuguese epitheto, Italian epiteto), from Greek epitheton "an epithet; something added," noun use of adjective (neuter of epithetos) "attributed, added, assumed," from epitithenai "to add on," from epi "in addition" (see epi-) + tithenai "to put, to place" (from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Epithetic; epithetical.

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unconventional (adj.)

1832, from un- (1) "not" + conventional (adj.). "A 19 cent. epithet for a certain type of affectation" [Weekley]. Related: Unconventionally.

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Astyanax 

son of Hector and Andromache in the "Iliad," a Greek name, literally "lord of the city," from asty "city" (see asteism) + anax "chief, lord, master." Also the epithet of certain gods.

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Phoebus 

epithet of Apollo as sun-god, late 14c., phebus, febus, from Latin Phoebus, from Greek Phoibos, literally "bright, shining, radiant," a word of unknown origin. Related: Phoeban, Phoebean.

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pintail (n.)

type of duck, 1767, from pin (n.) + tail (n.); so called from the peculiarity of the tail (narrow with long central feathers). In Middle English it is given once (c. 1300) as an epithet for the hare.

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blazing (adj.)

late 14c., "shining," also "vehement," present-participle adjective from blaze (v.1). As a mild or euphemistic epithet, attested from 1888 (no doubt suggesting damned and connected with the blazes, the euphemism for "Hell").

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bonny (adj.)

"pleasing, good-looking," "a gen. Scottish epithet of appreciation" [OED], but often used ironically, attested from 1540s, of unknown origin; presumably from Old French bon, bone "good" (see bon). Related: Bonnily; bonniness.

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claviger (n.)

"one who carries a key of a room," c. 1600, from Latin claviger, from clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook") + stem of gerere "to bear" (see gest). Latin claviger also was an epithet of Hercules, from clava "club, knotty branch," which is related to clavis.

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misbegotten (adj.)

"bastard, illegitimate, unlawfully or irregularly begotten," 1550s, past-participle adjective from obsolete misbeget "beget wrongly or unlawfully" (c. 1300), from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + beget. "Used as a general epithet of opprobrium" [Century Dictionary].

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margarite (n.)

"a pearl," late Old English, from Late Latin margarita (see Margaret). Figuratively, "that which is precious or excellent, a priceless quality or attribute;" also used as an epithet for Christ, Mary, etc., late 13c. Also margerie (mid-14c.). Related: Margaritic.

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