Etymology
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declare (v.)

mid-14c., declaren, "explain, interpret, make clear;" late 14c., "make known by words, state explicitly, proclaim, announce," from Old French declarer "explain, elucidate," or directly from Latin declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "to clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)).

From mid-15c. as "assert, affirm." Intransitive sense "make known one's thoughts or intentions" is by 1840. Related: Declared; declaring.

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*kele- (2)
*kelə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shout." Perhaps imitative.

It forms all or part of: acclaim; acclamation; Aufklarung; calendar; chiaroscuro; claim; Claire; clairvoyance; clairvoyant; clamor; Clara; claret; clarify; clarinet; clarion; clarity; class; clear; cledonism; conciliate; conciliation; council; declaim; declare; disclaim; ecclesiastic; eclair; exclaim; glair; hale (v.); halyard; intercalate; haul; keelhaul; low (v.); nomenclature; paraclete; proclaim; reclaim; reconcile.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit usakala "cock," literally "dawn-calling;" Latin calare "to announce solemnly, call out," clamare "to cry out, shout, proclaim;" Middle Irish cailech "cock;" Greek kalein "to call," kelados "noise," kledon "report, fame;" Old High German halan "to call;" Old English hlowan "to low, make a noise like a cow;" Lithuanian kalba "language."
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outlaw (v.)

Old English utlagian "to banish, proscribe, declare an outlaw; to deprive (someone) of the benefits and protections of the law," from utlaga "an outlaw" (see outlaw (n.)). Related: Outlawed; outlawing.

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protest (v.)

mid-15c., protesten, "to declare or state formally or solemnly, bear witness or testimony to," from Old French protester and directly from Latin protestari "declare publicly, testify, protest" (see protest (n.)). Original sense preserved in to protest one's innocence. The meaning "make a solemn or formal declaration (often in writing) in condemnation of an act or measure, proposed or accomplished," is from c. 1600. The word's association with marches and rallies arose in 20c. Related: Protested; protesting.

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state (v.)
1590s, "to set in a position," from state (n.1); the sense of "declare in words" is first attested 1640s, from the notion of "placing" something on the record. Related: Stated; stating.
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testate (adj.)
"having left a valid will," late 15c., from Latin testatus "public, manifest, published," past participle of testari "make a will, be witness to, declare" (see testament).
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overstate (v.)

1630s, "assume too much grandeur;" see over- + state (n.1). Meaning "exaggerate in statement, declare too strongly" is attested from 1798, from state (v.). Related: Overstated, overstating.

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penalize (v.)

1868, in sports, "to disadvantage one competitor for a breach of the rules," from penal + -ize. The meaning "to make or declare (an action) legally punishable" is by 1879. Related: Penalized; penalizing; penalization.

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criminate (v.)

1660s, "declare guilty of a crime;" 1670s, "censure, hold up to blame," from Latin criminatus, past participle of criminare "to accuse of a crime," from crimen (genitive criminis) "crime" (see crime). Related: Crimination (1580s).

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indictive (adj.)
"proclaimed," 1650s, from Late Latin indictivus "proclaimed," from Latin indicere "to declare publicly, proclaim, announce," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + dicere "to speak, say, tell" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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