Etymology
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condemn (v.)

early 14c., condempnen "to blame, censure;" mid-14c., "pronounce judgment against," from Old French condamner, condemner "to condemn" (11c.) and directly from Latin condemnare, condempnare "to sentence, doom, blame, disapprove," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + damnare "to harm, damage" (see damn (v.)). Replaced Old English fordeman.

From late 14c. as "hold to be reprehensible or intolerable," also "afford occasion for condemnation, bear witness against." From 1705 as "adjudge or pronounce as forfeited" (as a prize of war, etc.); from 1833, American English, in the sense of "to judicially take (land, etc.) for potential public use." From 1745 as "judge or pronounce (a building, etc.) to be unfit for use or service." Related: Condemned; condemning.

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condemned (adj.)

1540s, of persons, "found guilty, at fault, under sentence, doomed," past-participle adjective from condemn. Of things or property, "found unfit for use, adjudged to be unwholesome, dangerous, etc.," from 1798.

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condemnatory (adj.)

late 16c., "conveying condemnation or censure," from Latin condemnat-, past participle stem of condemnare "to sentence, to blame" (see condemn) + -ory.

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condemnation (n.)

late 14c., condempnacioun, "strong censure," from Late Latin condemnationem (nominative condemnatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin condemnare, condempnare "to sentence, to blame" (see condemn). From late 14c. as "the act of condemning; damnation."

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reprobate (v.)

early 15c., reprobaten, "condemn, disapprove vehemently," from Late Latin reprobatus, past participle of reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn" (see reprobate (adj.)). Later coming to mean "reject, put away, set aside" (by c. 1600). Related: Reprobated; reprobating.

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predoom (v.)

"condemn beforehand," 1610s, from pre- "before" + doom (v.). Related: Predoomed; predooming.

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reprove (v.)

c. 1300, repreven, repruve, reproeven, "accuse, charge as a fault," from Old French reprover "accuse, blame" (12c.), from Late Latin reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn," from Latin re- "opposite of, reversal of previous condition" (see re-) + probare "prove to be worthy" (see probate (n.)).

From mid-14c. as "deliver a rebuke, admonish;" late 14c. as "disapprove, condemn, find fault with." Related: Reproved; reproving; reprovable.

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doom (v.)

late 14c., domen, "to judge, pass judgment on," from doom (n.). The Old English word was deman, which became deem. Meaning "condemn (to punishment), pronounce adverse judgment upon" is from c. 1600. Related: Doomed; dooming.

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damnable (adj.)

mid-14c., dampnable, "worthy of condemnation," from Old French damnable and directly from Medieval Latin damnabilis "worthy of condemnation," from Latin damnare "to doom, condemn" (see damn). Meaning "odious, detestable, abominable, deserving of condemnation" is from c. 1400. Related: Damnably(late 14c., dampnably).

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sentence (v.)

c. 1400, sentencen, "to pass judgment," from sentence (n.) or from Old French sentenciir, from Medieval Latin sententiare "pronounce judgment upon," from Latin sententia. Specifically as "condemn" (to a punishment) is by 1590s. Related: Sentenced; sentencing.

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