Etymology
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announce (v.)
c. 1500, "proclaim, make known formally," from Old French anoncier "announce, proclaim" (12c., Modern French annoncer), from Latin annuntiare, adnuntiare "to announce, make known," literally "bring news to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nuntiare "relate, report," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Related: Announced; announcing.
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announcer (n.)

1610s, "a declarer, proclaimer," agent noun from announce. The radio sense is recorded from 1922.

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unannounced (adj.)
1775, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of announce (v.).
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announcement (n.)
1798, from French announcement, from Old French anoncier "announce, proclaim" (see announce). Or else formed in English from announce + -ment. Earlier in same sense was announcing.
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*neu- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shout." It forms all or part of: announce; denounce; enunciate; nuncio; pronounce; renounce.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek neuo "to nod, beckon," Latin nuntius "messenger," Old Irish noid "make known."
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annunciate (v.)

"bring tidings of," 1530s, from Latin annunciatus, misspelling of annuntiatus, past participle of annuntiare "to announce, relate" (see announce). In some cases perhaps a back-formation from annunciation. Middle English had also a past-participle adjective annunciate "announced in advance, declared" (late 14c.). Related: Annunciated; annunciating.

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annunciation (n.)

early 14c., anunciacioun, "Lady-day, Church festival commemorating announcement of the incarnation of Christ," from Anglo-French anunciacioun, Old French anonciacion "announcement, news; Feast of the Annunciation," from Latin annuntiationem (nominative annuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of annuntiare "announce, relate" (see announce).

The general sense of "an announcing" is attested from early 15c. The Church festival (March 25) commemorates the visit of the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, foretelling the incarnation. Old English for "Annunciation Day" was bodungdæg.

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forebode (v.)
"feel a secret premonition," especially of something evil, c. 1600, from fore- + bode. Transitive meaning "announce beforehand, presage," especially something undesirable, is from 1660s. Intransitive sense "to presage" is from 1711. Related: Foreboded; foreboding. Old English forebodian meant "to announce, declare."
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an- (2)
a later form of Latin ad "to" before -n- (see ad-), as in annex, announce, annihilate.
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predicate (adj.)

"belonging to a predicate; constituting a part of what is asserted of anything," 1887, from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare "proclaim, announce" (see predicate (n.)).

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