Etymology
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writer (n.)

Old English writere "one who can write, clerk; one who produces books or literary compositions," agent noun from writan (see write (v.)). Meaning "sign-painter" is from 1837. Writer's cramp attested by 1843; writer's block by 1950.

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screenwriter (n.)

"writer of film scripts," 1921, from screen (n.) in the cinema sense + writer.

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copywriter (n.)

"writer of copy for advertisements," 1911, from copy (n.) in the sense of "the text of an advertisement" (1905) + writer. Related: Copywriting.

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typewriter (n.)

in the mechanical sense, 1868, from type (n.) + writer. Related: Type-write (v.) "print by means of a typewriter;" type-written (1882). Slang office-piano "typewriter" is by 1942.

It is the advantage of the typewriter that, due to its rigidity and its space precisions, it can, for a poet, indicate exactly the breath, the pauses, the suspensions even of syllables, the juxtapositions even of parts of phrases, which he intends. For the first time the poet has the stave and the bar a musician has had. For the first time he can, without the convention of rime and meter, record the listening he has done to his own speech and by that one act indicate how he would want any reader, silently or otherwise, to voice his work. [Charles Olson, "Projective Verse," 1950]
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staffer (n.)

"staff-writer," 1949, in journalism, from staff-writer (1878); from staff (n.) in the "group of employees" sense.

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lexicographer (n.)

"a dictionary-writer," 1650s, perhaps based on French lexicographe "lexicographer," from a Latinized form of Greek lexikographos, from lexikon "wordbook" (see lexicon) + -graphos "writer," from graphein "to write" (see -graphy).

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logograph (n.)

"instrument for giving a graphic representation of speech, word-writer," 1879, from logo- "word" + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Earliest use (1797) is in the sense "logogriph," and it frequently was used in place of that word (see logogriph). In ancient Greek, logographos was "prose-writer, chronicler, speech-writer." Related: Logographic.

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obituarist (n.)

"the recorder of a death; a writer of obituaries," 1792, from obituary + -ist.

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chronicler (n.)

"a writer of a chronicle, a recorder of events," early 15c., agent noun from chronicle (v.).

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parodist (n.)

"a writer of parodies," 1742, from French parodiste (18c.), from parodie (see parody (n.)).

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