Etymology
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Clinton 

surname, attested from early 12c., from village of Glinton, earlier Clinton, Northamptonshire (now Cambridgeshire); the second element is Old English tun "farm, village," the first is of unknown origin. 

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Tampa 
city in Florida, U.S.A., probably from the name of a Calusa village, of unknown origin.
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Tennessee 
state and river, from Cherokee (Iroquoian) village name ta'nasi', of unknown origin. Related: Tennesseean.
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Gravenstein 
apple variety, 1802, from Gravenstein, German form of the name of a village and ducal estate (Danish Graasten) in Schleswig-Holstein.
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Lassa 
1970 in reference to a febrile disease of tropical Africa, from Lassa, name of a village in northeastern Nigeria.
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Tijuana 
from the name of a Diegueño (Yuman) village, written Tiajuan in 1829; deformed by folk-etymology association with Spanish Tia Juana "Aunt Jane."
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Potomac 
river in eastern U.S., from Algonquian Patowmeck, originally the name of a native village in Virginia, perhaps literally "something brought."
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Bethany 
Biblical village, its name in Hebrew or Aramaic (Semitic) is literally "house of poverty," from bet "house of" (construct state of bayit "house") + 'anya "poverty."
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Hussite (n.)
1530s, follower of John Huss, Bohemian religious reformer burnt in 1415. His name is said to be an abbreviation of the name of his native village, Husinec, literally "goose-pen."
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Caracas 
Venezuelan capital, founded 1567 by the Spaniards on the site of a razed village of the Caracas people, whose name is of unknown origin, and named for them.
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