Etymology
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skilled (adj.)

1550s, past-participle adjective from skill (v.) "to have personal and practical knowledge" (c. 1200), from Old Norse skilja "separate, part, divide; break off, break up; part company, take leave; discern, distinguish; understand, find out; decide, settle," from the source of skill (n.).

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craftsmanship (n.)

"skilled mechanical workmanship," 1650s, from craftsman + -ship. Craftmanship is attested from 1839.

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pharmacologist (n.)

"one skilled in pharmacology," 1728, from pharmacology + -ist.

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pyrotechnician (n.)

"manufacturer of fireworks, one skilled in pyrotechny," 1729, from pyrotechnic + -an.

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climatologist (n.)

"one studying or skilled in climatology," 1844, from climatology + -ist.

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practiced (adj.)

also practised, "expert, skilled through practice," 1540s, past-participle adjective from practice (v.).

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shanachie (n.)

"skilled teller of tales and legends," from Old Irish sen "old" (from PIE root *sen- "old").

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obstetrician (n.)

"one skilled in obstetrics," 1793, from Latin obstetricia "midwifery" (from obstetricus; see obstetric) on model of physician.

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handy (adj.)

c. 1300, "skilled with the hands" (implied in surnames), from hand (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "conveniently accessible" is from 1640s.

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orthopedist (n.)

"one skilled in curing natural deformities in the human body," 1853, from orthopedy (1840), from French orthopédie (18c.); see orthopedic + -ist.

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