Etymology
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retainer (n.1)

[fee to secure services] mid-15c., "act of keeping for oneself, an authorized retention (of dues, etc.)," an agent noun from retain (v.), or perhaps from or influenced by French retenir, infinitive used as a noun. Meaning "a retaining fee, fee paid to an attorney or barrister to secure his services" is from 1818. The general sense of "sum paid to secure special services" is from 1859.

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officiant (n.)

"one who conducts a religious service, one who administers a sacrament," 1836, from noun use of Medieval Latin officiantem (nominative officians) "performing religious services," present participle of officiare "to perform religious services," from Latin officium "a service; an official duty; ceremonial observance" (in Medieval Latin, "church service"); see office.

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CIA 

U.S. civilian espionage agency, initialism (acronym) of Central Intelligence Agency, founded 1947 as successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS).

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redemptioner (n.)

"one who is or may be redeemed or set at liberty," specifically, in U.S. history, "indentured servant," 1775, from redemption + -er (1).

REDEMPTIONER. One who redeems himself or purchases his release from debt or obligation to the master of a ship by his services; or one whose services are sold to pay the expenses of his passage to America. [Webster, 1830]
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agribusiness (n.)

also agri-business, "agriculture as conducted on commercial principles, the business and technology of farming; industries dealing in agricultural produce and services," 1955, a compound formed from agriculture + business.

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salesman (n.)

"one whose occupation is the selling of goods, services, or merchandise," 1520s, from man (n.) + sales (q.v.), genitive of sale (n.). Compare craftsman, tradesman.

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remunerate (v.)

1520s, "to recompense, pay (someone) for work done or services rendered," usually in a good sense, back-formation from remuneration or else from Latin remuneratus, past participle of remunerari (later remunerare) "repay, reward," from re- "back" (see re-) + munerari "to give," from munus (genitive muneris) "gift, office, duty" (see municipal).

The sense of "reward or pay for services rendered or work done" is by 1580s. Of things, "to recompense," by 1849. Related: Remunerated; remunerating; remunerable.

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paycheck (n.)

also pay-check, "paper check issued by an employer to pay an employee for labor or services," 1894, from pay (n.) + check (n.1).

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privatize (v.)

"make private as opposed to public," especially of a state transferring services or industries to private enterprise, 1966, a back-formation from privatization (q.v.). Re-privatise is attested from 1942. Related: Privatized; privatizing.

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ordinal (n.)

early 14c., "book setting forth the order of services in the Church," from Late Latin adjective ordinalis (see ordinal (adj.)), which was used as a noun in Medieval Latin.

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