Etymology
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Swedenborgian 

1791, from name of Emanuel Svedberg, Swedish mystic and religious philosopher (1668-1772). His followers organized 1788 as The New Church.

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Thea 

fem. proper name, from Greek thea "goddess," fem. equivalent of theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts).

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Hussite (n.)

1530s, follower of John Huss, Bohemian religious reformer burnt in 1415. His name is said to be an abbreviation of the name of his native village, Husinec, literally "goose-pen."

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Bar Mitzvah 

1842, in Judaism, "male person who has completed his 13th year" and thus reached the age of religious responsibility; Hebrew, literally "son of command." As a name for the ceremony itself, by 1917.

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Timothy 

masc. proper name, from French Timothée, from Latin Timotheus, from Greek Timotheos, literally "honoring God," from time "honor, respect" (see timocracy) + theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts).

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Theodosia 

fem. proper name, from Greek Theodosia, literally "gift of the gods," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + dosis "a giving," from stem of didonai "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

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Theophilus 

masc. proper name, Latinized form of Greek Theophilos, literally "dear to God; loved by the gods," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + philos "loved, beloved" (see -phile).

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Theodore 

masc. proper name, from Latin Theodorus, from Greek Theodoros, literally "gift of god," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). The fem. form is Theodora.

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Almohades 

12c. Muslim religious power that ruled Spain and North Africa, founded by Mohammed ibn Abdullah, the name is literally "the Unitarians," short for Arabic al-muwahhidun "they who profess the unity (of God)," so called for their absolutist monotheism.

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Bethesda 

1857, name of a pool in Jerusalem (John v.2), from Greek Bethesda, from Aramaic (Semitic) beth hesda "house of mercy," or perhaps "place of flowing water." Popular among some Protestant denominations as a name for religious meeting houses.

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