Etymology
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pouch (n.)

early 14c. (late 12c. as a surname), pouche, "bag worn on one's person for carrying things," especially (late 14c.) "small bag in which money is carried," from Anglo-French puche, Old North French pouche (13c.), Old French poche "purse, poke," all from a Germanic source (compare Old English pocca "bag;" see poke (n.1)). Extended to sac-like cavities in animal bodies from c. 1400.

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pouch (v.)

1560s, "put in a pouch;" 1670s, "to form a pouch, swell or protrude," from pouch (n.). Related: Pouched; pouching.

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marsupial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the implacental mammals," who usually are provided with a pouch for their young, 1690s, with -al (1) + Modern Latin marsupialis "having a pouch," coined from Late Latin marsupium "pouch, purse" (Classical Latin marsuppium), from Greek marsipion, diminutive of marsipos, marsippos "bag, pouch, purse," a word of foreign or Pre-Greek origin. As a noun, "a marsupial animal, an implacental didelphian mammal," from 1805.

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oocyst (n.)

in biology, "sac or pouch serving as a receptacle for eggs," 1875; see oo- "egg" + cyst.

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mailbag (n.)

also mail-bag, "bag in which the public mail is carried," 1794, from mail (n.1) + bag (n.). Mail-pouch in the same sense is by 1838. The Mail Pouch chewing tobacco brand painted its advertisements on barns across the middle of the U.S. from 1891 to 1992.

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cystic (adj.)

1630s, "pertaining to the gall bladder," from French cystique (16c.), from Modern Latin cysticus, from Greek kystis "bladder, pouch," which is of unknown origin. Meaning "pertaining to a cyst" is from 1713. Cystic fibrosis coined in 1938.

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barf (v.)
"to vomit or retch,"1960, American English slang, probably imitative. Related: Barfed; barfing. Barf bag "air sickness pouch" attested from 1966.
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sporran (n.)

furred leather pouch, 1753, sparren, from Gaelic sporan, Irish sparan "purse," of uncertain origin. Familiarized by Walter Scott.

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cyst (n.)

"bladder-like bag or vesicle in an animal body," 1713, from Modern Latin cystis (in English as a Latin word from 1540s), from Greek kystis "bladder, pouch," which is of uncertain etymology.

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rantallion (n.)
"One whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis, i. e. whose shot pouch is longer than the barrel of his piece." ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," Grose, 1785]
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