Etymology
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movie (n.)

1912 (perhaps 1908), shortened form of moving picture in the cinematographic sense (1896). As an adjective from 1913. Movie star attested from 1913. Another early name for it was photoplay.

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movies (n.)

"moving pictures," 1912, see movie.

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Sensurround 

1974, proprietary name for movie special effects apparatus, coined from sense (n.) + surround.

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newsreel (n.)

"short movie dealing with news and current events," 1916, from news (n.) + reel (n.).

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out-take (n.)

also outtake, "rejected part of a film," 1960, from out- + take (n.) in the movie sense. Related: Out-takes.

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auteur (n.)

"filmmaker whose influence and artistic control are so great that he is regarded as the author of the movie," 1962, from French, literally "author" (see author (n.)).

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CinemaScope (n.)

1953, proprietary name for wide-screen movie technology; see cinema + scope (n.2).

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slasher (n.)

1550s, "a bully, a fighter;" 1815, "weapon for slashing," agent noun from slash (v.). As "violent movie" by 1978.

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film (v.)

c. 1600, "to cover with a film or thin skin," from film (v.). Intransitive sense is from 1844. Meaning "to make a movie of" is from 1899. Related: Filmed; filming.

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MGM 

abbreviation of Metro Goldwyn-Mayer, U.S. movie studio noted for the roaring lion in its emblem, attested from 1933.

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