Etymology
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loosen (v.)

late 14c., losnen (transitive) "make loose, free from tightness," later lousen (early 15c.), from loose (v.) + -en (1). Intransitive sense of "become loose" is from 1670s. Meaning "limber the muscles before physical effort" is from 1955. Related: Loosened; loosening; loosener.

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lyso- 

word-forming element indicating "loosening, dissolving, freeing," before vowels lys-, from Greek lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to loose, loosen," from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart."

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electrolyte (n.)

"substance decomposed by electrolysis," 1834, from electro- + Greek lytos "loosed," from lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").

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lytic (adj.)

"pertaining to lysis," 1889, from Greek lytikos "able to loose, loosing," from lytos "loosed," verbal adjective of lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Related: Lytically.

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hydrolysis (n.)

"chemical decomposition by water," 1879, formed in English from hydro- + Greek lysis "a loosening, a dissolution," from lyein "to loosen, dissolve" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Related: Hydrolitic (1875).

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solve (v.)

late 14c., "to disperse, dissipate, loosen," from Latin solvere "to loosen, dissolve; untie, release, detach; depart; unlock; scatter; dismiss; accomplish, fulfill; explain; remove," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." The meaning "explain, answer" is attested from 1530s; for sense evolution, see solution. Mathematical use is attested from 1737. Related: Solved; solving.

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-lysis 

scientific/medical word-forming element meaning "loosening, dissolving, dissolution," from Greek lysis "a loosening, setting free, releasing; dissolution; means of letting loose," from lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie," from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart."

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absolution (n.)
Origin and meaning of absolution

"remission, forgiveness," c. 1200, from Old French absolucion, earlier assolucion, from Latin absolutionem (nominative absolutio) "completion, acquittal," noun of action from past-participle stem of absolvere "set free, loosen, acquit," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + solvere "to loosen, dissolve; untie, release; dismiss," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." Originally of sins; in general use from c. 1400.

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untie (v.)

Old English untigan "loosen, unchain," from un- (2) "opposite of" + tie (v.). Related: Untied; untying.

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solute (adj.)

"dissolved," 1890, from Latin solutus, past participle of solvere "to loosen, dissolve," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." In botany, "free, not adhering" (1760).

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